Monday, 25 July 2016 09:41

Ringer Radio Episode 17

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Monika
Good Afternoon, Atlanta. This is Monika Meacham and Gabriel Meacham here with Ringer Radio.

Gabe
It’s been a great week and we’ve got a lot to share with you guys. We have some excellent guests with us.

Monika
We have Sue Davis and __ from Injured Gadgets here with us today. Welcome.

Gabe
So you guys are right up the road from us. We see the sign every time. You’re on Holcomb Bridge right?

Monika
Our favorite street…

Gabe
So one of the first topics we want to talk about is challenges. We’re going to start off light with the stupid challenges we always see on…

Monika
…go on Facebook and…the Ice Bucket Challenge was one. It had a good cause.

Gabe
Nobody understood what it was. What was the cause for that?

Monika
That was for ALS.

Gabe
The new one is [The Running Man Challenge]. I haven’t figured out the cause for this one.

Shay
I was slightly addicted to watching a whole bunch of those Running Man Challenge videos. Now I’m kind of over it but the little doggies doing the Running Man and then I saw a dude dressed up as a zebra.

Gabe
We need to come up with a challenge. Once a year we do a website for a charity and this year we’re thinking about making it a Social thing to where we come up with a way to have people vote for which charity we do it for. I want to do a challenge where ‘send me a video of the grossest thing you would eat for a charity’ (Monika says NO)

Monika
There are people out there who would do anything for Social phenomenon.

Shay
Gross is also relative. One of my Asian buddies, when we go out to eat, is always like “do you want to get some chicken feet?”

Sue
It’s definitely got to be humiliating. As a business owner I always think of liability.

Gabe
Maybe ‘show me how awesome you are’ but I think we’ll get more submissions if it’s something gross.

Shay
If you look at the past challenges like the Ice Bucket, the idea behind it is you’re soaking yourself in a bucket of ice cold water. You’re looking at people’s reactions afterwards. Same with the Running Man Challenge…

Monika
For some people it will be easier than others. Some people can eat chicken feet…

Gabe
We’re just going to have to revisit this one next week.

Sue
Have you guys seen the Jimmy Kimmel Candy Challenge (Halloween Challenge)? It’s where you tell your kid that you’ve taken the Halloween Candy away from them and eaten it all and then tape your kid’s reaction?

Monika
So again, we have Sue and __ with us here from Injured Gadgets. So tell us a little bit about your business…what you guys do.

Sue
We are wholesale parts suppliers for the cell phone industry. We sell phone parts. We sell your home buttons, your docks, your LCDs, your digitizers…

Monika
Would that include tablets as well or just phones?

Sue
We do some. We do the iPads. We’ve done some Samsung tablets but we really more so focus on phones.

Monika
So you said wholesale. So you’re not the typical retail shop that you can walk into and say “my phone is broken”. You actually work with the retail stores right?

Shay
We’re a distributor so we sell our parts to all the repair stores, but the great thing about us is that while we do cater to mostly wholesalers and repair stores, we offer tons of do-it-yourself videos, tutorials and guides and then anyone who wants to repair their own tablet and phone can just visit our website and they can buy the same part…

Gabe
So essentially it’s for the guys that aren’t afraid of their phone out there. “I’ll watch a couple videos, we’ll be good to go.”

Shay
It’s still risky. The first time I tried to repair my own phone I ended up with a bag of screws. That was after me seeing and selling phone parts for over a year. Then again, I’ve never been too inclined to repair anything. Every time I’ve watched videos on repairing and tried to do it myself…

Gabe
I’ve got a buddy that’s the same way. A lot of people are technically inclined enough to do it. There’s people out there building drones all over the place. There’s people out there just watching something on YouTube and going “OK, I can do that.”

Sue
We don’t want to simplify what repair shops do. These phones have a million parts with how advanced technology is. One thing that we have offered that has been helpful to repair shops as well as to the do-it-yourselfers is we do have a pretty extensive YouTube channel so anytime a new phone comes out or a new device comes out, Shay will try to buy it the day it comes out and we’ll do the tear down video to show how the phone is taken apart. Eight years ago when he started to work on phones he didn’t do that great of a job but now he’s fantastic.

Monika
It’s not a bag of screws anymore.

Sue
Not at all. It’s good that we can offer that additional aspect of our business to repair shops as well as the do-it-yourselfers.

Monika
Well that’s great content in general, just in terms of the online world.

Gabe
So you’re not only providing the parts but also the knowledge to the repair shops so they can have…

Shay
We have the knowledge for the repair shop and we also like to stay informed of all the new devices and new technology out there. We publish weekly blogs with what’s going on, the newest phones, the fastest processors, the new chip sets..whatever it may be just because it’s such a big industry. I don’t think there’s a point of just limiting ourselves and our knowledge to just one aspect of that industry.

Gabe
The businesses that are very successful are the ones all-around providing an education to their customer base via online. It seems like it’s the newest and best sales model. I don’t have to keep the information to myself anymore. It’s “I’m going to give everybody the information and everybody sees it and it’s a great form of advertising.

Shay
Especially since it is such a new industry. Cell phone repair and tablet repair has really only been around for 8, 9, 10 years. You don’t want to limit the industry and it’s growth. There’s enough business out there for everybody so providing the knowledge and information out there is just so important.

Monika
Everyone has a phone and on top of that there’s a lot of people like me that are clutz and drops them and it cracks.

Gabe
I’m a pretty techy person but there’s no way I’d ever think about tearing apart my phone. I’ve broken too much stuff in my life. There’s no way. Anyway, we’re about to go to break in a second so when we come back we’ll talk about [challenges] and the formation. You guys are brother and sister so that’s got to be a challenge in and of itself. When we come back from commercial we’ll dive right into it.

Monika
Ringer Radio.

Gabe
Hello and welcome back to Ringer Radio. We’re switching over to Studio B and we’re still with our guests.

Monika
We’re here with Sue and [Akshay] from Injured Gadgets.

Gabe
Let’s throw out the contact information.

Monika
How does one find you?

Sue
www.injuredgadgets.com. We are at 2535 Holcomb Bridge Road, Norcross, GA.

Monika
Is there a number they can contact you on?

Sue
770-674-1150 and also Facebook.

Monika
We were talking about challenges before and again you guys are brother and sister. So what kind of challenges do you guys have when it comes to business overall?

Sue
I’m going to take this one…

Shay
This is one of the challenges.

Sue
I’m the older sibling. Shay and I are both good at what we do individually and fortunately we don’t like the same thing, so what he’s good at I suck at and what I’m good at, he sucks at. So there are very few instances where we’re butting heads on things. This is not our first business together. We’ve had a couple of other businesses together before and we’ve had this business for 8 years together, so I think we’ve maneuvered a lot of the big issues. We still have moments here and there…

Shay
…daily.

Gabe
It’s probably just the typical brother and sister back and forth banter

Sue
Yeah, it’s more of a banter. It’s not anything tragic or big or anything like that. We still go to lunch almost everyday together. He’s still one of my best friends. We leave work sometimes and we’ll get in the car and I’ll call him and he’s like “we just left work.” I’m like “I know but I want to talk” and so we’ll talk…

Shay
No, she’ll talk and I’ll put it on mute…

Sue
We’re incredibly close. Even last night he came over for dinner. So I think we’re fortunate. I think it is kind of a weird dynamic and it takes a special relationship to be able to make that work but he’s my sibling. He’s my only sibling so we’ve grown up together.

Monika
Is there a big age gap between the 2?

Sue
Four and a half years but he keeps telling me I’m 900 years older than him on a daily basis. He’s like “yeah, yeah, you’re much older so I get it.”

Gabe
But that makes you right much more of the time right?

Sue
Exactly. I’m older so I think I trump on decisions right?

Shay
We let you think you trump on decisions. She usually wins because she has really good logic.

Sue
I probably should have been a lawyer.

Shay
With that age comes wisdom.

Monika
So does one of you run the finances, one of you run the operations account? How do you do that?

Sue
Shay handles our procurement, our warehouse, all our sourcing of inventory and I like to say that I keep us legal. So I hire our people, make sure payroll is good, make sure taxes are good, finance is good.

Monika
So you’re basically the G&A part and he’s operations. You’re administration, running HR, sales…Do you run over the sales part too?

Sue
I handle all of our corporate clients. We also have a retail side to our business for walk-in clients, so I handle that. Shay handles more of anything that’s leaving the building, going out of GA, the procurement and the shipping of that.

Shay
Pretty much everything online.

Sue
So he’s online and I’m retail.

Gabe
He’s the face of the online business as well.

Sue
So anytime we get a big franchise…lately we’ve been focusing on franchises and we’ve gotten several big franchises. So I handle that division of our company and make sure they’re on boarded properly. It works out well because I’m not really interested in the warehouse part of or the online stuff or sourcing parts and he’s not really interested in hiring people or finance or making sure taxes are paid or payroll is done so it works out very well. I trust him wholeheartedly for what he does and I trust him wholeheartedly for what I do so there’s not really a big discussion about our own individual things. Occasionally we’ll have different viewpoints and we’ll talk it through. Because we’ve been siblings [our whole lives] we’ve figured out a way to work through it.

Gabe
We’re married so we kind of deal with the same thing. I’m hearing a lot of echos.

Monika
And your brother works for us so…

Gabe
We’ve got nepotism all over the place. It’s amazing. Are there any unwritten rules that you can think of that we can share with the users. If you’re in this situation, these are the things that you know you’re just never going to do because your relationship is not just business, it’s also a forever relationship?

Sue
Like what? Give me an example.

Gabe
For us, one of them is ultimately she wins. I can take on a little bit of a different persona at work because it’s a work role and she’s going to have to understand that this is the “work Gabe” and then this is the “home Gabe”.

Monika
I definitely have had to learn when to leave the “work Gabe” alone when he’s in the middle of something. If he’s working on something I know this is the time for me to step back. I can’t bug him even though I’m married to him.

Sue
I think for us it’s a little different because he is married, I am married, and we don’t live together so we do get that break. He’s better about it than me because sometimes I’ll leave work and I’ll call him right after and I want to talk about work. He’s like “OK we just spent the whole day talking about work. What else do you want to talk about?” We take lunch together almost everyday so we’re rarely good that when we take lunch we rarely talk about work.

Monika
So you know when to break from the work setting?

Sue
Yeah. Our parents live here. Our spouses live here. We obviously have friends because we’ve grown up here. It’s OK to ask for insight on your business but I think one thing we’ve been very good about is at the end of the day, it’s our company and we make the decisions. There’s been a lot of insight that both of our spouses and parents have given us that have been great but the fact that at the end of the day we make the decisions based on where and how we see our company growing. It’s just us, which has been good for us. When there’s too many cooks in the kitchen it can kind of spoil things, so the fact that we’ve been able to decipher, even if we get industry knowledge from someone else, we’re able to decipher what’s best for our company together.

Monika
Do you have a stop where you say “we left work. We’re at home hanging out…” do you have a way you try to keep work away from when you’re out or does it not matter to you really? Do you think that’s something that you think is a good thing to keep away from when you’re at home?

Shay
Not really. Work is still so much fun and we enjoy what we do that we don’t mind talking about it but it’s not like it comes up too often outside of work. The things that do come up outside of work are the things that are kind of neat like ‘we’re growing in this section and we’re going to be doing this soon’ so it’s more so an enjoying conversation and a fun conversation rather than “aw man, here’s what happened and this sucks.”

Gabe
We were just talking about the same thing last night. We’re on the creative side of things so we get home and it’s a great business that we’re in because we can constantly be thinking of different things and different taglines and different options and different ideas and bounce them off each other without feeling sick of it. It’s great when you’re both excited about it.

Sue
I think one thing that’s also helpful for us is we do handle such different parts of our business that when we talk it’s a new topic for each of us because that’s not what we handle so it doesn’t really get boring. Also the fact that we are both excited about our industry…we’ve got 8 years in this and we’re still both excited about it. We’re still doing new things in the industry. We’ve actually started working on our own software that’s industry specific, so it’s stuff that we enjoy and we’re growing in the industry as it’s growing because we did start at the beginning.

Monika
Eight years ago is really when the smartphone revolution started.

Sue
We started selling the original iPhone screen.

Shay
Watching it change and watching the newest updates come out is incredible.

Gabe
What I think is crazy is the amount of adoption people have had. It went from you’ve got an iPhone, you’ve got 1 of these devices and now if you ask people they’ve got like 4…

Monika
You get confused when you see somebody with a flip phone, which is very rare.

Gabe
So with that, we’re going to go to our commercials so give us a listen when we get back. We’re going to dive in a little bit more with some of the challenges you’ve actually had with startup and since then.

Monika
Welcome back, Atlanta. This is Ringer Radio here with Monika and Gabe Meacham.

Gabe
Hey Atlanta. If you want to get ahold of us you can go to our website: www.hirearinger.com.

Monika
So again, we’re here with Sue and Akshay __ from Injured Gadgets and we’ve been talking to them about [challenges]. So you guys have had your business for 8 years now, so let’s go back to the beginning a little bit. I understand that you’ve had other businesses as well so it’s probably a little bit easier but what would you say that you ran into the most when you were starting up that if you were to go back, maybe you’d change or think about a little bit differently?

Shay
I personally think the hardest part of selling a product is to have a good manufacturer behind you. That’s the same with the cell phone repair stores we sell to…for them to find the right supplier who will help support your business, is probably the most critical part of everything. So when we first started, finding a supplier who would stand behind their products, who knew the type of quality we were wanting, that was the hardest part…especially since we source so much from China and Hong Kong, there’s so many different variances and grades and qualities that you can get and obviously, if we’re trying to grow a business we don’t want to have the lower grades…B Grades…we want the best stuff. That’s the only way you’re going to stay in business for a long time. So finding the actual suppliers who understand the quality we’re looking for, the type of people we’re selling our stuff to…not fly-by-night shops…that was the hardest part, I think.

Monika
Did you pick up the phone [or was it just a bunch of trial and error]?

Sue
It was a bunch of trial and error.

Monika
So you just called them up like “I’m looking for a manufacturer”? How did that part take place? The first one you called up…how did you find the first person you needed to speak to?

Shay
Eight years ago we went on Alibaba, which back then nobody knew about it, but obviously when they went public their IPO was the largest IPO in the history of the stock exchange. We were doing Alibaba back then and looked for the products we were looking for.

Monika
There may be people out there that don’t know what Alibaba is. You want to explain that?

Shay
Alibaba is kind of the like the Amazon of China, but not only China…essentially the entire world. The only difference between them and Amazon is they don’t actually supply any of the products they sell. They give you connections to suppliers. So suppliers can list their stuff on the website…kind of like Ebay. Now they’re definitely worth more than Amazon. I believe their stock prices eclipsed theirs. Eight years ago, when we got on it, they were much smaller. We would go on there, search for what we were looking for, contact 50 different suppliers, ask them for pictures of what they were selling. Back then we were only buying $2-$3,000 in parts. We’re not going to go fly to China to see the quality of what we’re buying.

Gabe
My first J-O-B was for a company called Extension Technology and they bought and sold and sourced hard-to-find and obsolete IC’s and electronic components and stuff like that. I remember back in the day, the worse part about that business was in order for you to establish a relationship with a new supplier. You’d start getting shipments and maybe the first one was great, the second one was great, the 3rd one was all wrong and then you’d go to try to call the people and they’re just gone. They disappeared off the face of the earth.

Sue
We had to deal with some of that as well. Like Shay said, you’re not flying out to China in the beginning. Now we have the bigger volume and we can do that but when we first started you have to go on trust. In fact, our first several purchases, we had to go and do Western Union because they didn’t want to take wires. There’s no way for us to ensure our money was going to get to them and we’re going to get our parts. We lost money in the beginning. There were times we would get a batch of items and…we’re both big on making sure the quality is good…there were times if we got a bad batch we would just have to eat the cost. We were new in the business and new in the industry and we didn’t want to have a crappy product out there. We had both left careers to do this so we wanted to make sure that it made sense. That was definitely a learning curve. I hate to say this but there’s so much…you don’t know who’s good and who’s not. You don’t see the product, you don’t see the quality, you don’t know how they’re going to ship it. Sometimes you’re going to get the screens and half of them are going to be damaged because they’re stacked on top of each other…they’re going to have LCD issues. So for us, that was probably our largest and most expensive learning curve was to find the suppliers that you trust and there’s thousands and thousands of people that do this in China so it’s not particularly easy to find the right people.

Monika
So when you lost your batches, it makes you question a little bit, especially in the beginning of a business. Did you ever go through that where you’re questioning “am I in the right thing? How do I overcome this?” How did you keep going? How did you not make that stop you? Because a lot of people get stopped especially when they lose money.

Sue
Shay and I, because we had had a couple of previous businesses, we learned that in life you have to take risks, spend money to make money. All this sounds cliché but that’s really what you need to do when you’re in business. I feel like we were pretty smart about it because we both had great jobs and we kind of did it in phases. Obviously, we’ve established that I’m a little bit older than him so I had a little bit more of a senior position than he did so he was able to leave his job once our business started picking up. We started on Ebay and once our business started picking up he left the job first while I continued to make my income so the company could pay him but it didn’t have to pay me. Then shortly after, I quit my job. But we made sure in that year period that we were starting our business and growing it up that we had savings and that we weren’t relying on our company to give us a paycheck. For the 1st few years we really didn’t take paychecks.

Shay
Not only that, for the 1st year to year and a half we really didn’t make any money…we pretty much broke even. Then after that, the idea was never really to take a paycheck it was to reinvest every single dollar we could back into the business.

Monika
I think that’s something a lot of business owners miss. They think when they start making money they start taking it out. What you’re doing is exactly what you need to do in order to… Obviously you have to take paychecks and pay for yourselves, but when you do make extra money, instead of pulling that out and putting it in your pocket, if you reinvest it within the business, that’s just more avenues to grow the business for a bigger future. Sometimes that’s missed for some reason.

Shay
That continues to be true even once you’ve established yourselves. We’re starting now, software for the repair industry and we have this huge mailing list of people who want to get into the beta version of it. Based upon that we’re going to be grossing significantly more than it costs us to actually run the software every month, but the idea with that is still the first 1, 2, 3 years, we’re going to take all the profits and put that back into developing the software, adding additional features, even though we’re already profitable on one end of the business, the idea is to have the software grow into something that we, right now, probably can’t even imagine it becoming. Essentially, once you have a successful business it really doesn’t end there. It still continues.

Sue
One thing that our accountant told us a few years ago, and I think we’ve always relied on this…”when you take your distribution, whether it’s monthly or whatever, take it in thirds.” So 1/3 of our money goes to me, 1/3 goes to him and 1/3 of our money goes to the business for future growth. Fortunately we don’t take that much for ourselves at this point because we are able to pump more money into the business but I think a lot of business owners miss that. They see these big paychecks and they see all this money rolling in and they go upgrade their house and their cars and their lives. Probably from learning from our previous businesses we learned that ‘hey, we’re making money but let’s grow our business for right now.’ When we 1st started our business, Shay wasn’t married, I had just gotten married, but my husband has a great job so we had the ability to not have to take those big paychecks and we had the ability to just focus on our business and for us that was a good thing.

Gabe
So for young entrepreneurs or somebody that’s starting a business, to sum everything up, if you think you’re going to get paid right away, then you probably have the wrong mindset. You’ll probably need to look at everything as at least a 10 year investment before you start feeling that level of accomplishment where you can actually take sums of money out and go on vacations and stuff like that.

Monika
For us, if we both went back out into the work world, we easily could bring back 10x what we make right now but it’s all about the future so that’s what we’re thinking about. It’s fine to keep going the way we are and as long as we have a roof over our head and food in our mouth, everyone’s happy…clothes and things like that then that’s what matters. Keep chuggin’ along and putting it back into the business. That’s the best way to grow.

Gabe
There’s a level of encouragement that I’d give to the listeners…’the reason you’re doing it is for ultimate freedom and flexibility.’ We couldn’t do any of the fun stuff that we get to do now had we not decided we’re not going to work for corporate anymore and get paid and be cushy knowing that money’s there and we don’t have to worry about it. We’re going to take the risk. That risk ultimately leads to freedom and that’s what entrepreneurs and young businesses enjoy.

Sue
Absolutely. When we started we worked a lot. Shay was up at 2, 3, 4, 5am talking to suppliers because of the time difference.

Shay
I still do.

Sue
It was just us and 1 other employee. Obviously now we have a team.

Gabe
How big is your team?

Sue
We’ve got about 10 people right now and we’re looking at hiring some sales executives so hopefully we’ll have that team grow quite a bit in the next few months.

Gabe
At this point we’re going to pause for our commercial sponsors. Give them a listen and come right back. Future Gabe…

Monika
Welcome back, Atlanta. Again, Hi, this is Ringer Radio. We’re here with Gabe and me, Monika and we have Sue here and Akshay from Injured Gadgets. We’ve been talking to them about challenges, from the Running Man Challenge, earlier, to the challenges of running a business and sourcing and manufacturing. We don’t really talk much about dealing with clients but…

Gabe
…clients are the easy part. We can just run right over that. That’s no big deal.

Sue
The best clients in the world.

Gabe
This is where we really open the floor to you guys.

Monika
Tell us again about you guys, where you are. Who’s your ideal client? How can somebody get ahold of you? Who would pick up the phone and call you?

Sue
We are a wholesale phone parts company. We do sell some iPad screens as well but really what we do is we sell everything that makes your phone your phone, with the exception of the motherboard. Your small parts, your docks, your home button, your speaker, your screens, LCDs… Our target customers are going to be those repair shops.

Monika
So you’re mainly a business-to-business business.

Sue
Correct. We’re a wholesale company. We do also sell on Ebay and Amazon and we have a pretty extensive YouTube Channel as well with DIY Repairs so we do also sell to people that walk off the street that want to try to fix their own phone. A lot of these phones are extremely complicated and we always recommend that you take it to a repair shop, but there are those people that are very electronically inclined and they want to try it. We’ve got the YouTube video, the parts, the tools for them to be able to do it as well.

Monika
Now a consumer wouldn’t just walk in the door to get their phone fixed. That’s not really your business model.

Sue
We don’t want to compete against the repair shops that buy from us so we do zero advertising for repairs. However, we do want to keep our techs up-to-date on knowledge so if someone walks in for a repair, if we have the ability to do it at that time [if it’s something quick] we’ll do it. If not we’ll refer it to one of our customers.

Shay
If it’s something we haven’t done before we’re always happy to pop open a phone we’ve never worked on before. For instance, the S7 Edge, which came out a month and a half ago, if somebody walked in with that, I’ll probably just do it for cost. I want to pop that open and look at the internals.

Monika
And that phone may be featured on your YouTube Channel.

Shay
Probably.

Sue
Anything that’s new, Shay jumps at the chance to do it because we want to offer that education also to the repair shops that buy from us and the do-it-yourselfers that buy parts from us. We don’t want them to damage the part and return it. We want to offer that knowledge, so if someone comes in and says “hey, will you repair this phone?” we typically will if it’s something that’s new or something that’s a quick repair. If it’s something that’s either extensive or something we just don’t have time to do, because that’s not our focus…we don’t advertise repairs…then we always refer to somebody who buys from us.

Shay
Our target audience is always repair stores. We want to be the all-in-one shop so right now while our main focus us obviously distributing cell phone replacement parts and the internals, we’re also soon going to be getting into our own line of accessories and software. Our cell phone software user interface is actually going to be up as of Thursday.

Monika
Are you doing that internally?

Shay
No we hired a company in Philadelphia but after they completed the basic beta and everything we’re actually going to be looking for our own programmers and developers for it. The idea is once we have about 100 users that we’d be able to have 2 onsite developers at all times. That would be great for troubleshooting and adding new features and everything like that. We want to encompass everything. We’re going to have a wiki for it, a blog for it, support forums. The idea is to encompass every single aspect of the business, not just focus on one area.

Gabe
Are you always going to stick with the idea of phones or do you imagine yourself branching off into some other consumer electronics at some point?

Shay
The great thing is that this type of industry…you don’t know where it’s going to go. For instance, Motorola came out with the Droid Turbo 2, which they advertise as having an unbreakable screen and there was videos of people dropping it off of 150ft bridges and it’s still not breaking. So if that technology becomes really cheap 5 years from now are people going to be repairing their cell phones? I don’t know. It could end up being software. It could end up being computer repair or laptop repair. So we’ve never thought about limiting ourselves and that’s why we like to keep up-to-date with the newest knowledge and the newest blogs and checking everything out just because you never know what technology’s going to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now. Like we said, 7-8 years ago, this industry was brand new and last year it was a $4 billion industry and the year before it was a $1 billion dollar industry, so it grew 400% in a year.

Gabe
I don’t see people not buying screens anymore.

Sue
The phone is everyone’s lifeline. People can’t deal without their phones.

Monika
I can walk away without my credit card and my driver’s license but I cannot leave without my phone.

Shay
These phones, especially the flagships, are $700-$800 phones. I’m looking around, there’s some Note 5s, the G5, S6 Edge. If you guy go these out of contract, they’re $700-$800. It’s a much better option to fix your phone for $150-$200, maybe less, depending on which phone you have, than going and getting a brand new phone. We’re always keeping our eyes open, trying new things and trying to stay in the industry and up with it.

Monika
So again, how does somebody find you? What’s your website address?

Sue
It’s www.InjuredGadgets.com and you can email us at support@InjuredGadgets.com. Wholesale customers can email us at wholesale@InjuredGadgets.com. We can be found at 3525 Holcomb Bridge Rd, Norcross, GA and 770-674-1150 if you want to reach us.

Monika
So do you guys have any questions for us?

Gabe
We’ve got exactly 3 minutes so I’m going to take this 3 minutes and go ahead and call out Monika Scott. She challenged me to a balloon making contest and I take these challenges very seriously so I’m going to announce that I’m going to smear her…

Monika
Let’s back up so people understand why you have this weird challenge happening. We’ve mentioned it before but Gabe went to Clown College…

Gabe
This is a secret.

Monika
I’ve already told people before.

Gabe
That’s not the only college I went to, let’s just preface that.

Monika
OK one of his colleges was Clown College. But apparently Monika Scott, who’s a lawyer, decided that she makes better balloon animals than…

Gabe
She was bragging and she called me out and she said “I challenge you.”

Monika
So what they’re gong to do is have a balloon challenge in 2 weeks where they’re allotted 4 entries. Each entry, they’re allowed 3 minutes a piece to make the best balloon animal they can with as many balloons as they can in 3 minutes. We’re going to do Facebook Live for each challenge so people can check it out. Monika has her own law firm as well, The Scott Law Firm. She’s actually about to open up a juice shop as well, Sublime Tree, which is coming soon. Thank you guys for being on the show with us today. We appreciate it. If anybody has any questions for Sue or Akshay, they gave out their information or you can always contact us as well. We’d be glad to pass along the message. Our number is 404-369-0009. You can also reach us at www.hirearinger.com. Thanks a lot guys, you have a wonderful afternoon.

Read 1191 times Last modified on Tuesday, 09 August 2016 10:14

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