Monday, 11 July 2016 10:31

Ringer Radio Episode 13

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Monika
Good afternoon, Atlanta. This is Monika Meacham and Gabriel Meacham with you here with Ringer Radio.

Gabe
Hello Atlanta. I hope you’re having a great Friday and the skies are clear. If they’re not, and it’s raining again, tough luck. That’s just how it goes sometimes.

Monika
As a reminder, we’re pre-recorded so as of right now it’s nice weather outside but yesterday it was raining.

Gabe
These people do not want to hear about the weather. We’ve got an awesome show. I’ve got one of my longest, old time buddies, Black Cantebury. He’s been out there just doing it for the last 10 years and it’s always good to check on him because he’s always doing something awesome. Blake, hey, how’s it going?

Blake
Good, man. Thanks for having me.

Gabe
Real quick, we want to give the Blake Bio…the high level “this is what he’s all about”. When I knew Blake it was back in the WinNet days…

Monika
The WinNet days? People don’t know what that means.

Gabe
That was my first Web Design/Branding type of company…

Monika
…which was 10 years ago?

Gabe
A long time ago. And Blake was one of the creatives with us there and since then you went off to Be Remedy. It’s kind of one of my things…you see one of your guys go off and fly out of the nest and he’s on Be Remedy and the next thing you know he’s on 11 Alive News all the time and the next thing you know, he does a Ted Talk and the next thing you know he’s doing all the conferences that are the big 5,000 people conferences and the next thing you know he’s blowing up. So it’s kind of like we want to touch base with Blake and find out what’s been going on. Before we get into that, just a news bulletin to everybody, I shaved the beard. I got tired of it and sick of it. So I look a little more human…

Monika
…not quite. It looks a little odd. You went from mountain man to confused.

Gabe
I am a little confused right now. The mountain man may come back but people gotta stop growing these beards all the time.

Monika
You’re just jealous that other people are growing beards.

Gabe
It makes me mad. It’s my thing. It’s not everybody’s thing. It’s been my thing for 10 years.

Monika
You started the beard thing?

Gabe
All these metros with skinny jeans and big long beards running around, I don’t need it.

Blake
Sorry.

Gabe
Blake, so is it true that you were an Abercrombie model at one point?

Blake
We’re going to go there already?

Gabe
We may as well just jump right in. We’ve got Blake with us. Tell me, what have you been doing recently?

Blake
It’s kind of a cool time to have a conversation. For the past year I’ve been at an agency called Brand Apart in town. We went from 9 people to 20 people. We built an office space out in Atlantic Station and are doing some really amazing work that a lot of people haven’t known that we were doing. Working a lot with Chick-fil-A…they’ve been a big good client for a long time…everything from their conferences to private programs to marketing opportunities. It’s a really cool company. As of 2 weeks ago, I don’t work there any longer. I stepped out to do another venture on my own. I love those guys, still tout them. The work that they do is incredible and I was honored to get to work there for a year. I’m headed out now, focused on this concept of purpose…finding purpose in life.

Gabe
This is so déjà vu.

Blake
This is right where I left the WinNet days to step out…

Gabe
…it was to do Be Remedy at that point. I remember we were sitting on the back porch and you told me “look man, I’ve got something on my heart. This is what I feel like I need to do.” We were like “dude, you’ve got my blessing. Whatever you want to do, just go for it.” You did exactly that.

Blake
I don’t know how much you remember of those days but I told you the concept and you said “you’re going to end up leaving us to go do that one day.” And that was when it was a concept, it was an idea. Two weeks later Atlanta flooded. We did some disaster relief, social media wise, networking people inside the disaster. Three months later, an earthquake hit in Haiti and I had an opportunity to go and you basically said “Blake, you’re fired. Go do it. You’re kicked out of the nest. Go for it.” And that was seriously the push I needed to go risk everything. I got out of my lease, went and moved in with a friend, got rid of everything I owned, went down and launched social media campaigns inside of Haiti where we ended up networking help for almost 110,000 people. Networked United Nations, Meridans Purse, __...it was unbelievable. None of that would have happened if I hadn’t jumped and been pushed out of the nest a little bit. Thanks Gabe.

Monika
Was that under Be Remedy that you did all that?

Gabe
Most people don’t understand the concept and especially then, they didn’t understand leveraging social networking to actually help people. It was more than just saying “hey, my kitty’s fluffy. Look at it.” It was “how do we connect all these people?” you had that vision from the get go for a real purpose for it.

Monika
So that’s what the concept is overall? It’s about networking social networks.

Gabe
Can you break it down for us? You can do a better job than we can.

Blake
The concept was really simple. Everybody wants to help other people or people would do good if they were given the opportunity. Most people just don’t know where or how to start. So we went into communities and partnered with organizations that were credible, to give us a credible source of needs, and all that you had to do was follow us on social media. The concept of ‘what would your city look like if 50,000 people got a notification at the same time of an urgent need?’ There shouldn’t be a need in our city that we couldn’t meet. That was really the concept.

Monika
So this was like 10 years ago, is that right?

Blake
That was 2009, so 7 years ago.

Monika
So at that point the big platforms were out there…Twitter, Facebook…

Blake
MySpace was on the way out and Twitter was on their 5 year anniversary and so one of the cool moments for us, we had just done the Haiti stuff, we had went back and we were helping these individual people with needs and CNN called one day and said “we want to run a story.” I thought we’re probably not ready yet but let’s go do it because no good deed goes unpunished and we’ll find out whether people like the idea or hate it. So CNN ran a story on a Sunday on the website and it went well.

Monika
How do you know it went well?

Blake
We only got 2 pieces of negative feedback. One was that we didn’t have enough needs and number 2 was that we were only in Atlanta. So I said “OK we can fix both of those problems. We’re less than a year old.” It was great. Two days later, I woke up and my phone was exploding and Twitter had announced that it was their 5-year anniversary and that morning CNN had ran another headline. In the headline that morning, they named us one of the 3 best Twitter usages, worldwide. Number 1 was the Egyptian uprising…how they used social media to overthrow a government; Number 2 was Charlie Sheen and then Number 3 was us. At that point our message really got out there. I told you that story really to tell you where social media was at the time. That was almost Twitter’s launching pad. Ashton Kutcher had just really leveraged it and it just hit 1,000,000 users, but the everyday person wasn’t really on the platform yet.

Gabe
How’d Ted come along?

Blake
It was kind of an interesting journey. We had been running Be Remedy for a year, year and a half in Atlanta, and I wanted to test it in a city that was completely different from Atlanta. So we set up a test pilot in Bend, Oregon. I had a friend that I really trusted, there. They were doing a lot of non-profit work on the ground and so that was just a trusted place. I said “if this fails in Bend nobody will ever know because most people don’t know where Bend, Oregon is.” It went really, really well. Oddly, Facebook was setting up a data center just outside of Bend and there were a lot of big players coming through Central Oregon at the time so it was a great time for us to network. They ended hosting their first big Ted conference in Bend, so I was invited, because of the relationships there, to come do a Ted Talk in Bend.

Monika
Wow! This was how many years ago?

Gabe
This was before anyone knew what Ted was.

Blake
It wasn’t what Ted is right now. I think the main conference probably was Tedex hasn’t really been birthed yet. It was an amazing opportunity, to be alongside those guys…the stories…one guy that was speaking that day, Joseph Stalin called him a threat to the communist party and had him thrown in solitary confinement for like 8 years. It was nuts. Just an amazing opportunity to brush shoulders with that caliber of person.

Monika
Had you ever done any public speaking like that before?

Blake
A lot of really small opportunities…

Monika
So it wasn’t your first…

Blake
100-500 people, but Ted’s a different pressure. It’s a different level…when you’re doing the walk through with a lot of people watching in the audience, and knowing that it’s a live stream and if you mess up you can’t go back and you only have the 17 minutes to speak and so you can’t flub. You can’t go back and you have to stay within the scope and say everything you’ve dreamed of saying to the world in 17 minutes. So it is a different talk.

Gabe
It’s much like the radio and so with that we’re going to go listen to some commercials.

Monika
Welcome back, Atlanta. This is Ringer Radio. Again you have Monika Meacham, Gabriel Meacham here with you. We have Blake Cantebury here with us, who’s a serial entrepreneur, you could say.

Gabe
He’s a giver-preneur. I don’t know if there’s a better word for it but he’s an all-around good guy. I’ve never seen anybody that is more committed to doing something worthwhile and for other people…very selfless in that way. Anyway, let’s dive right back in. we were talking a little bit about Be Remedy and the starts of that. One of the biggest conversations that we have on this station is nothing is easy. Granted, our moms and our dads have said “you can do whatever you want. You should have to work hard enough.” We always glaze over the “work hard enough” when we realize how long that could take. We get this weird idea, as young entrepreneurs, that “if I just work hard enough for like a month, then all my dreams are going to come true.”

Monika
That’s because you’re given a lot of falsehood out there. There’s people that say “you can be rich in a month.”

Gabe
Some people are lucky. Some people stand up and money falls on them but the truth is, you hear about those stories, but percentage-wise, they’re so few and far between that they’re almost not even a blip on the probability map.

Monika
And there may not be happiness involved either because I think if you’re doing any type of business, it shouldn’t be for money, number 1, it should be for what you’re actually doing.

Gabe
Then there’s the other conversation, especially if you’re doing something that’s more purpose-driven that sometimes you have to do things for money to drive the purpose-driven dream. There’s been so many thoughts that go into your head like “if I’m just doing the right thing things will just work out for me. Why doesn’t it all just work out for me?” Anyway, let’s back into the rise of Be Remedy…

Monika
…the hustling part of it. I hear he was couch surfing for a while to get this off the ground.

Blake
I definitely did that. I got rid of everything and just kind of slept on couches the entire first year to get it off the ground. My journey has been between Be Remedy and then going to go do Brand Apart and now leaving to go do something else, there’s kind of a tagline that I’ve been rapping my thoughts around lately and I think it’s pure motivation. It’s “Do Something Because Doing Nothing Gets You Nowhere”. Then I flipped it a little bit and I ended saying “Do Something Because Doing Nothing Gets Us Nowhere.” I think we have different skillsets in life and we all have different talents and I think the temptation is for us…I’m a dreamer so I can go listen to a Ted Talk, I can go watch an inspirational talk or movie and I can walk out and think “I’m going to go change the world.” And I sit down and start writing notes and that may happen at 6pm. By the time I get home, I eat dinner, I turn on the news and lay down in bed at night, I’ve thought of 50 reasons why I can’t do that dream. We look at what we’re up against with Isis. The one that gets me is other people my age who are further down the road than I am. I look around and it’s the Zuckerburgs and it’s the Stroms and it’s the guys who are near my age they’ve just crushed it. They’re billionaires and I’m like “if I haven’t done it by this age, then I’m probably not going to do it.”

Monika
I don’t think that’s necessarily a true statement though.

Gabe
That’s a mindset still.

Blake
That’s the thing that holds us back. What happens is we get overwhelmed and when we get overwhelmed we do nothing. And doing nothing gets us nowhere.

Monika
Absolutely.

Blake
And I think whatever that wall is for you…maybe it’s not somebody else, maybe it’s your own challenges…but I think we all have things that we use as vices or reasons to not do whatever the next step is. And if you find whatever your personal motivator is to get past that next step…the world needs what you can do.

Monika
Faith in yourself is generally the greatest motivator, in my opinion, it’s faith in yourself. Because if you don’t have faith in yourself and what you’re doing, you’re never going to be able to move to that next step like you’re saying. You’re going to hold yourself back because you don’t believe in yourself in some way.

Blake
I think that’s totally it because what happens is the easiest thing is to do nothing. The easiest thing is to sit home, watch another TV show and let another night pass. When the reality is, if you came home from work and spent that time working towards a dream or something that you’re great at, or just leverage your resources for a cause that you care about, now you’re moving the world forward. We just sit too many times and we don’t leverage what we could leverage.

Gabe
What was that defining moment? At some point with Be Remedy, you started seeing it come together.

Blake
I think it was just baby steps…each day another step toward what I wanted. I see the world as “here’s how things could be and should be.” That’s my north compass. It’s like “here’s where we’re headed.” And when I’m able see a step towards that becoming a reality, the next day it’s easier to keep going. So I think for us it was people are genuinely signing up to help. People are actually getting help. Maybe it’s a pair of shoes. Maybe it’s a refrigerator for somebody but these items are actually getting met. As that began to grow, I think it was just a snowball effect of confidence and emotion that this is solving a problem in the world.

Gabe
I remember one indistinctly where somebody’s house had burned down. I remember you put out the call like “we need this, we need that” and within 5 minutes you already had commitments of people…everything that they needed.

Monika
And that was all through the social networks…

Gabe
We could see it all through the Twitter feed and that was amazing to watch and just watch somebody out there just organizing it and doing it and watching the whole thing coming together. I guess even at those high points where you think you’ve got it all together and you think everything is…one of the big things we could talk to our listeners about is even at that point, sometimes you can be blindsided. You can be so close to everything you want coming true. I know in my life that’s happened countless times and with you, baseball and with this. Do you want to talk about that a little bit?

Blake
Yeah. I think so many times we hear the success stories and that’s what causes me to see the Zuckerbergs and the Twitter guys and say “I’m not capable.” The reality is 90% of those stories are the ones that really suck and we don’t talk about those enough. We had proven concept after 5 years, which is probably entirely too long. The vision was to create this technology platform that would automate what we were doing so that we could scale nationwide and internationally. We went down that road and one of the most pivotal things or crucial things that you can do as an entrepreneur if you’re taking on money, is choose your investors wisely. I thought that we had and we made a bad step and we were not in line on the mission and vision of the company. Ultimately we ended up parting ways because of that. Talk about being on the cusp…the technology was 95% done. We were in the middle of closing a conversation with Huffington Post so that our needs were going to go through Huffington Post Editorial, the platform, and then if a disaster hit, I would go live on Huffington Post Live and talk about these things until we created a momentum of helping and awareness. So we had these massive conversations on the line and because I made one bad decision, we split the whole company and I ended up exiting the company because of that. We were a month away from all of the dreams coming true and they came crashing down and I had to walk away.

Monika
That was after 5 years right?

Blake
5 years and when you recount the days, I think you have to find the meaning and purpose in what you’re doing to make it all worth it, because otherwise, it feels like 5 wasted years. When you think back to the relationships of friends that you leveraged and the years of sleeping on couches and leaving jobs and risking everything, you have these days of “oh my gosh, was I wrong the whole time?”

Gabe
Yeah, when you’re back to square zero. Square zero sucks because it makes it like “was this whole time wasted?” We know that in the big picture, time is never wasted and experiences build us as people to better prepare us for the things that we’re about to do.

Blake
That’s exactly where I am now.

Gabe
It takes a while for that to really sink in. how did you get yourself back?

Monika
Before we go into how he did that we need to take a quick break in terms of time because we are out of time.

Gabe
Alright when we come back, how do you find the courage to come back from that and do something that’s so very similar.?

Monika
And would you change anything? On that note, we’ll be right back.

Monika
Alright, welcome back, Atlanta. Again, this is Monika Meacham and Gabriel Meacham here with you. It’s Ringer Radio. We have Blake Cantebury here. We’ve been getting into some really good conversation with him. He is a serial entrepreneur. He’s been doing a couple different things, working in the real world as well and talking about some of the struggles he’s gone through, specifically a non-profit he was doing a while back. Before the break we were getting into how you’re going into a new phase right now. I’m sure when everything happed with Be Remedy, at the end, you said “I would have changed this.” But now coming to where you are today, because of all the steps you’ve gone through…you’ve been a creative director at a pretty good company, then you moved on and now you’re ready to start something again in the same area of what you did with Be Remedy. Knowing where you’re at today and where you see your future and knowing your past, would you change it at this point or do you think that it’s been the proper steps to lead you to where you are going to go from here.

Blake
It’s a great question. Sometimes you see people that have been through big challenges in life and you hear them say “I wouldn’t have changed it for the world.” I always hear that and I really question the honesty like “you can’t change it so is that what you’re saying? Are you just dealing with it?” I think going through what I’ve went through, I’ve really found that to be true in a couple different ways. One, I was 23 when I started and I remember the word entrepreneur, I didn’t even know it existed. It wasn’t because it was a cool thing. It wasn’t what everybody was doing. I remember watching the Facebook movie, Social Media Network and when Justin Timberlake sat up out of bed and she asked him what he was doing and he said “I’m an entrepreneur.” That’s the first time I heard that word and thought “oh that’s kind of cool. There’s something to that.” And I remember Googling it.

Monika
Was it just because Justin Timberlake was the one saying it?

Blake
Totally. I didn’t know what I was doing so I obviously made a lot of mistakes early and I didn’t realize how important certain key things were. Surely we would have built to scale it faster. I would have taken some steps before. The other thing is I can’t emphasize how important your team is and having the right people on the bus…the whole Jim Collins ‘get the right people on the bus’. It’s crucial. It’s critical to everything that you’re going to do.

Gabe
There are people that will dive on your bus just to be involved and I’d like to take a second there…you’ve got to be very, very careful on who you let tag along. I definitely remember at one point, you had people coming out of the woodwork saying “we’ve got to help” and all these helps came with conditions. You’ve got to be really careful on who you let be part of that.

Blake
There’s few people that don’t want something in return. I’m an idealist and I love people but humans are flawed and so a lot of times there’s a motivation behind every good deed. I wish it wasn’t but it is. I’ve learned so much and I’ve heard that investors like to invest in people who have had a startup before…especially ones who failed. There’s some things in town at ATDC and Atlanta Technology Angels and those guys will tell you over and over, some people will say “I won’t invest in somebody unless they failed before.” I’m like “that’s a terrible idea.” But after going through what I went through…I get it. I know the mistakes I made and I see them more because of what happened than I would have if we had been a huge success. I would have thought everything I did was right. It’s been a huge launching pad for me to understand some of those critical errors. I spent probably 2 months dissecting every wrong move that I made…that’s probably not a wise thing to do, to harp on your failures…but I have them documented now and I look at them often. I’m like “here’s things that I did. Let’s not do that this time.”

Gabe
It’s kind of the old adage, ‘you don’t really understand love until you understand heartache’. You understand how motivated you’ll be to not make the same mistakes, to not feel that same way again. So unless you’ve been through it and it’s fallen apart on you…

Blake
Another side is, if we had the wrong people on the bus, I’m glad we got them off the bus. If that dream is still the right dream and it still could come to fruition one day, then let’s get the wrong people off the bus, no matter how hard that bus had to crash and let’s get a new bus and let’s go back down that road.

Gabe
Let’s just call a spade a spade. You’re giving up a dream job…you’re the creative director of this branding firm…

Monika
…that’s going pretty well, it sounds like.

Gabe
Yeah, it’s growing over and over and over and you could probably stay there and be a rock star for as long as you want. It’s very interesting that we’re getting this from you right now while you’re still going through it but you’re saying “this is my original passion” and it seems like you’re running after it again. What motivates you to do that?

Blake
I think for me the thing that motivates me is this word ‘Purpose’. I think a lot of us spend our days either not using our gifts or using our gifts. Culture tells us that instant gratification is what you want to do…find happiness, pursue it, go buy something, do whatever makes you happy. I think that’s why the term ‘mid-life crisis’ exists. Some people realize it when they’re 18, some head overseas and see it, some people hit 50s and 60s and they wake up and say “what did I do with my life?” I had a mentor a few years ago and he sat me down the first meeting we had. We talked for about 20 minutes and he said “OK we’re done. I want you to go home and I want you to write what you want on your tombstone and I want you to write your eulogy at your funeral.” I was kind of creeped out. I went home and the first couple days it was hard to work on it. As soon as I started getting to a place where I could write it and I knew what I wanted written and said about my life, it made total sense. When you write your personal manifesto for life…when you write your purpose statement, what you’re living for…essentially that’s what your eulogy is…it was your purpose in life, whether you defined it or whether it was defined by all these days of just mediocre living. I think for me that was a pivotal intersection of purpose in my life. Not to say that working the job that I was working wasn’t fulfilling a purpose but for me…I remember this day. I wrote down 4 things…1. I’m a big faith guy so it was “Love God”, “Be a Great Husband”, “Be A Great Father” and “Help Others Wanting Nothing in Return”. For me that’s my North Compass now. That is my direction for everything so when I have a good opportunity or a great opportunity, I’m able to put it through the lens of “does this fulfill my purpose or not?” If it doesn’t fulfill my purpose it’s easier to say ‘no’ to really good opportunities. So I’m sitting in my dream job and working with amazing clients and building up stuff that I’ve never had the money or resources to build before and I had to leave because it didn’t fulfill my purpose. I don’t know what that road looks like but I’m really tracking down this concept that everybody that I’ve talked to that has found their purpose, and people who have been successful in life and are satisfied in life, whether they’re calling it their purpose or not, in the middle of that it’s rooted and at some point wrapped around generosity. So this tagline that we’re really moving forward with is “Helping People Find Purpose Through Generosity”. So if you’ve built a great company, you’ve built a tool or a product that people love…it was for other people. Mother Theresa lived her life literally for other people. There’s 2 different spectrums but at the intersection of purpose is always generosity. So we’re heading down this path of helping people find purpose through generosity and it’s going to look and feel similar to Be Remedy and this time, to really just kind of tease it a little bit, we built the technology first and so we have a new technology tool. We’re kind of in stealth mode, but we’re launching a private beta right now, as we speak and I’m speaking to the 1st group about it next week. I really think the problems and the failures that we had the 1st time we’re fixing. We’ve built it knowing that those were the mistakes the 1st time and I think we’ve got the right people on the bus and I think our purpose is heading in the right direction this time and it’s built on that and I think we’re about to head to a huge success.

Monika
So going back to the question in the beginning of the segment, coming back to learning form where you came from, it sounds like overall the experiences of the past and the failures from the past has really helped guide you to doing the right steps now for this next one. Is that right?

Blake
No question.

Gabe
What’s striking me is you’re approaching it like an engineer. It’s like “I’ve indexed what it is that I didn’t like that happened and I’ve gone through one by one by one and just nope, nope…” and then you end up with your pure idea again. Does it have a name? What can you tell us right now?

Blake
It does. We’ll unveil the name…it’s called Purposity and it’s Purpose and Generosity put together.

Gabe
Right on.

Monika
That’s very catchy.

Gabe
With that we’re going to run to break and when we get back we’ll learn a little bit of what we can get out of this guy about Purposity and we’ll have a little bit of fun, so listen to some commercials and happy Friday.

Monika
Good Afternoon, Atlanta and Future Gabe. We’re back. This is Ringer Radio with Monika Meacham and Gabriel Meacham.

Gabe
I’m Gabe right now on Tuesday and I’ll be Gabe on Friday. We’re back with Blake Cantebury and if you missed it we just had a great conversation and we’re to the point where he’s teasing me about where he’s going next and he has all these plans and stuff but he’s like “the most I’m going to tell you is the name of what we’re doing.”

Monika
And that it’s in stealth mode and there’s some similarities to Be Remedy. We got that much.

Blake
Maybe we could cap it at If you liked what you heard and you’re super interested in what’s going on next I’m just going to put my personal information out there. You can contact me. If you Google Blake Cantebury you can’t miss me. I’m all over the Internet. blakecantebur@gmail.com you’ll get me. So reach out directly if you’re super interested. If you just have a question about something that happened don’t reach out but if you’re super interested about where we’re going and what’s happening next, we’ll need sponsors and partners so reach out if you’re interested in that.

Gabe
Let’s change directions. You’re working on some really cool projects so tell me about what was your favorite project that you worked on while you were at your last firm.

Blake
The agency Brand Apart…we really pride ourselves on not taking credit for anything…that everything was a team project so I’ll talk about some of the cool team projects that the agency put out.

Monika
Real quick, high level…Brand Apart…what do they do? What do they specialize in?

Blake
So our tagline is “Bringing Brands to Life and Life to Brands” so everything from events and experiences to strategy…this will be a better way to speak to it…one of the last things we did was Chick-Fil-A’s first television commercial in 20 Years without cows. They’ve had 1 campaign for 20 years and it’s been cows. So we put it out and it aired during the Oscars and then the season premier of The Voice and that was kind of the testing period for it.

Gabe
What was it?

Blake
If you go on YouTube and search Chick-Fil-A, under their brand page you can see 3 different versions of the spot.

Monika
How did the commercial go? Did they give you any results on how it went being that it was the first one without cows?

Blake
I don’t know what the numbers were but it went really well. The culmination of it was making the operator the hero and a lot of people don’t understand the value that the operator brings in Chick-Fil-A world. It’s a different model than a franchise model and the operator’s really critical to what happens in the unique experience that you have in the store so the tagline was “When It’s Yours It’s Personal”. So they paralleled a swim coach and a couple different story lines like an older guy that’s sewing something and the way that the needle goes through the fabric and every attention to detail is what creates the experience in a Chick-Fil-A store to be that perfect.

Monika
I gotta say, Chick-Fil-A, overall, is an amazing company. They may have some things that people don’t agree upon that have happened in the past but as a business they are probably one of the best franchise type of…

Gabe
I think they’re the best marketers in the world or at least they choose the best marketers in the world. I don’t know how you want to put that.

Monika
At one point, Gabe actually did their menu many years ago, didn’t you?

Gabe
Yeah I did a couple of the menus for one of the properties way back when.

Blake
Wow! That’s incredible. Ninety percent of what we did was with Chick-Fil-A that’s changing this year, so I can’t speak to a lot of what’s happening this year but there’s some cool new brands that they’re starting to work with. Another cool project with Chick-Fil-A is they have an Insider VIP Program that most people don’t know about and it’s called A-List and so Brand Apart was able to help them curate this A-List program and if you go to the same store over and over, the operator, if he notices you, will hand you a card and you become an insider and so you may get the opportunity to try new food before it hits the menu, select events that happen at home office…there’s some really cool perks.

Gabe
Do you think it’s some kind of weird karmic knot that you would be involved in a company that so aligns with your personality of giving, giving, giving?

Blake
I can’t seem to get away from it. I tried to go into pure agency world and work on amazing tech projects and marketing opportunities that I ended up working primarily with a brand like that. It’s funny how I can’t get away from it. Maybe it’s just building more relationships for the future.

Gabe
Maybe it’s just destiny.

So Blake, most of our audience are young entrepreneurs that either need a kick in the butt to get going or they’re going but they don’t have lots of experience behind them. Is there anything that, where you’re at in life right now, which is a very unique position, you would say to our audience one on one? What’s the one biggest thing that if you had your…

Monika
A piece of advice…

Blake
Probably the biggest lesson I’ve learned is that you don’t have to be great at everything. In fact, I’m a big believer…as an entrepreneur you jump into a company and you’re like “I have to do the marketing. I have to be the tech. I have to do sales.” And you divide and every other week becomes a different job and it feels broken up. One of the fundamental things is that I believe we have the potential to be great at 2 maybe 3 things in this world so figure out what your skill sets are. Figure out what you can be great at. Kobe Bryant and Steph Curry are huge right now. The focus on one thing and that’s basketball. They don’t focus on anything else. I think if you figure out what are the 2-3 things that you can be great at in this world and then put a team together of people who are great at things that you’re not. So if you’re not great at marketing, hire the first person on your team to be somebody who’s great at marketing. If you hate to do events, which I hate to do, one the first things to do is get somebody who’s great at events. One of the things is we don’t like to ask somebody to do a task that we don’t like to do because we feel like they don’t either and when you realize that somebody loves to do the thing you don’t love to do, you give them an opportunity to be great at something and you can stay in your lane. Now you have a team of people who are great at a couple things and I think you can really push the ball further, faster that way.

Monika
That’s a great piece of advice. You can’t do everything. You must get the right people in place. Sometimes it costs money and that’s unfortunate. When you’re ready to do it that’s when you do it.

Gabe
Blake, thank you so much for being here on the show with us today. I had a wonderful time. You’ve given us a lot of insight, especially with your story and I hope it helped somebody out there.

Monika
I wish you much success in your new venture.

Gabe
We’ll have to have you back on once you quit being so secretive about what you’re doing.

Blake
We’ll unveil everything. We’ll be totally transparent.

Gabe
If you’re interested in the future, listen in or just look up Blake Cantebury and I’m sure what he’s got going on will be all over the Internet.

Blake
Thank so much for having me.

Monika
If you want to reach out to us you always can at www.hirearinger.com or 404-369-0009. Happy Friday.

Read 892 times Last modified on Tuesday, 09 August 2016 10:15

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