Wednesday, 18 May 2016 12:35

Ringer Radio Episode 8

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Monika
Good Afternoon, Atlanta. This is Ringer Radio with Monica Meacham and Gabe Meacham.

Gabe
Hello everybody. It's a beautiful day. Let's get into it.

Monika
It is, so happy Friday everyone. One thing that we want to note out to you just as a reminder, these shows are always prerecorded, which is why we have that number for you all to call and give your questions on subsequent shows, but today we are actually, as this show’s going on, we are having our ribbon cutting at our new office. Well, it’s not really a new office…

Gabe
It’s the new and improved one with a sign.

Monika
It’s the new and improved one with the sign and the bricks aren’t falling off. Long story short, we actually moved into this building back in May of last year and 2 weeks after we moved into it, all the bricks fell off of the building…

Gabe
…off the front of the building. It was crazy. It was Memorial Day and then of course everybody out there knows how permits work…you have to send the permit to Japan somewhere and then it has to get turned around, then it has to come back through customs and get signed off by a million people, so it takes 4 or 5 months.

Monika
You have to do that twice. You have to do it once for the bricks, to get that fixed by the insurance company and then once from the city to actually get the permits for the sign…

Gabe
…so long story short, it’s been a way long time and we’re ready to finally invite all our customers in and show them where we work and how we work and all that stuff and do the ribbon-cutting, photo ops, stuff like that.

Monika
So if you are interested, please feel free to come by. Our address is 2660 Holcomb Bridge Rd., Suite 214. It’s across the street from the Target Shopping Center on Holcomb Bridge. You can't miss it. We have to sign. If you miss it I can’t help you.

Gabe
You have to turn around and come back, that’s all there is to it. There might be a balloon.

Monika
Maybe. We haven’t decided that yet. We will have, possibly drinks, though. A former guest of ours might be there, Goza Tequila, so we might have some tequila going on for people to try out or something. We’ll try to make it entertaining. Worst-case scenario, we have a pool table…you can play a game of pool.

Gabe
And if it gets too sober, Ingles is right there.

Monika
Ingles? What kind of alcohol do you have at Ingles?

Gabe
I don’t know. The bad stuff. Beer.

Monika
Ok so with that said, that little giggling you heard in the background is our special guest today. His name is Nick Black, with America’s IT Doctors. Welcome Nick.

Nick
Hey, how’s it going?

Monika
It’s going. So, we thought we’d bring on Nick today. He’s a young entrepreneur, going out there, hustling it, doing the deed, trying to make a name himself..a business…everything and competing with all those other sharks or guppies or whatever else is in the sea. So Nick, why don’t you give us a quick overview. What do you do?

Nick
I'm a superhero. We do superhero work.

Monika
Do you want to perform at our grand opening on Friday? Flying around. Isn’t that what super heroes do?

Gabe
We met Nick at…we actually met before the “I Hate technology” thing that you did, right?

Nick
It was at a iPro-networker, I believe.

Gabe
We met at one of those and then you put on your own mini conference…

Nick
…conference, meeting, seminar…

Gabe
Yeah, so we sponsored that…

Monika
He also won our Shark Pitch Challenges. We do this thing at expos and tradeshows, if we have a booth, we let people come up and pitch their service on camera, where they get the footage, 30 seconds or 45 seconds, and the best pitch wins a sushi gift card. We call it the Shark Pitch Challenge…

Gabe
…check it out at sharkpitch.com.

Monika
Nick won that for us. He had a really great 30-second elevator pitch.

Nick
Thank you. I have yet to use that sushi gift card, so we need to go out and do that.

Gabe
One of these day. So, let's cut to the chase…tell our listeners, what’s your business and then what makes you super awesome at your business.

Nick
So, I saw a trend in the IT industry, where it was mainly about money, money, money, money, money and a lot of small business owners would get screwed over because the old way of doing stuff was: if something breaks, you call, they come out to fix it, you leave them right in the middle of 285 and then they hit by the bus again, Marta Bus, and Boom, they come out and fix it again.

Monika
You’re talking about their computers, their servers or network?

Nick
Yeah, so what ended I up seeing was…it was just one of those things like “why do we let the client just keep getting hit, plow?” Why do we wait for disaster to strike, time and time and time again? Instead, let's go for more of a proactive approach. A lot of people would call this the MSP ordeal, Managed Service Provider or IT Service Provider, but the downside with that is they would do a proactive approach, but then on top of that, charge every time they send an engineer out or something breaks or whatever case was, and I had to think about it as a business owner: “if I'm already paying for service, how would I feel if I feel like I'm getting nickeled and dimed every time something breaks?” I’m starting to think “maybe that IT company is purposely breaking stuff”, whether it's the case or not.

Gabe
That’s the perception.

Nick
It’s a perception. So I tried to figure out “what is the best way to get the client to feel like they're on the same team with the IT Provider?” So what we said was “OK let's go ahead and give them unlimited support, unlimited hours and we just build a relationship that way.” It’s just a better way to build trust…

Gabe
So do you guys charge some sort of like flat monthly…

Nick
…flat monthly, yeah. Firewall provided, anti-virus, the whole 9.

Monika
What size businesses do you generally work with?

Nick
Anywhere from 5 to 35, that’s going to be like the sweet spot, there. Less than 5, no. Been there, done that.

Monika
So if somebody has a broken computer at home, don't call him.

Nick
We’ll leave that to Geek Squad.

Gabe
Let’s not bring them up. {Laughs}

Monika
So how long have you been doing this now? How long ago did you start America’s IT Doctors?

Nick
February 2012, so I was 20, going on 21.

Monika
Wow. Very young. So take us back, were you in school? Were you working? You saw the market, sure, but what made you, personally, at the age of 20 say “I'm going to be an entrepreneur”?

Nick
It was one of those things that I always wanted to do, growing up. As kids I used to sell paper airplanes. My brother I, we’d actually go around…we lived in York at the time…and we’d go around and get the plastic bottles out of recycle bins and cash them in. So that entrepreneurship drive was always there, but finally I actually got a car accident 2010 and I said “I could be dead or I could be doing something I’ve always wanted to do. What the heck, let’s go for it.” So I started figuring it out. I had no help, whatsoever. It is hard to find people to tell you how to do stuff. For whatever reason, people don't like to be forthcoming with information. I don't know why.

Gabe
Most people just don’t know. We have a vague idea of why we’re successful but it's not…

Monika
That’s how all successful business people say: “we have a vague idea of what happened…”

Gabe
When you get down to it, most people will say “it came down to luck. I was at the right place at the right time…” So you’ve been at it for how many…?

Nick
It’s been 4, going on 5 years now.

Monika
Are you enjoying it? Would you have it any other way?

Nick
I wouldn't have it any other way. I mean the entrepreneurship lifestyle and just everything, in general…I get to meet cool people like the Ringer Team! I wouldn’t have it any other way. I really wouldn't.

Monika
Very cool. Well, at this point, I guess we’re going to take a quick break because we’re at a good little segment, real quick. We’ll come back and we’ll talk about hustling and how it is to be an entrepreneur and getting out there and hustling and growing. Again, we’ll take a break real quick. Ringer Radio.

{Commercial Break}

Gabe
Alright all you fellow Ringer listeners out there. We are back to our show, Ringer Radio, and if you have a question or comment for us, Monika, give them the number…

Monika
404-369-0738. Leave a message and we will field your questions and then bring them up next week. If you have any questions for guest today, Nick, or any previous guests, you can always leave a message for them as well. We can get the questions to them.

Gabe
Didn’t we have any questions from last week that we thought were amazing or anything?

Monika
I didn’t see any, did you?

Gabe
No. Not really. Give us some good questions that are worth putting on air, people.

Monika
So let’s go ahead and head back into our conversation. Let’s talk a little bit about entrepreneurship and the hustle of being a small, young entrepreneur and what you have to go through, the rigmarole to A: make a name for yourself, B: grow your business and C: become an authority for what you do and get it to where that is what you do. You don’t have to worry about working a 9-to-5 job. Your businesses is enough to keep you happy and keep you going.

Gabe
Entrepreneur: the only people that will give up a 40-hour work week for an 80 hour work week and they think they’re better off. I make a calculated $5 an hour.

Monika
So Nick, from your perspective, how does entrepreneurship look to you? How has it been? You started very, very young so how has the hustle been? What do you do? What’s been the hardest part of being an entrepreneur to you?

Nick
It's not as peaches and gravy or you know all rosie…

Monika
Peaches and gravy?

Nick
I don’t know. I thought it was going to be just wonderful rainbows of “Ferrari”ness and “Lamborghini”ness…

Monika
You thought people would be coming to you saying “I want your services.”

Nick
“I need some IT!” No. At 1st you’re like “just toss a website up.” No. They don't come. The whole idea of “if you build it, they will come.” No! They don't come. You have to hunt for them.

Monika
Especially in a service-based business.

Nick
Oh my gosh, yes, and B2B service-based at that…it is difficult.

Gabe
It is tough. I remember 10 years ago, I was pretty much in your shoes. I had the IT company and this was up in Dawsonville, so you wouldn’t think that's where the action is, but what I ended up doing was I literally walked into places and I would kind of sit down and they’d be asking why I was there and I was like “I’m just waiting for something to go wrong. I’m here to fix it.” They were like “who do you have an appointment for?” and they try to kick you out. I’d just kind of play the dumb card and be like “look, you can't tell me there's not something that’s bugging you about wanting your computers with in this place. You give me 10-20 minutes. I won't charge you. If I fix it, you keep my name. If I don't, then you never hear from me again.”

Monika
So wait, you’re telling me you walked into random business…

Gabe
…I walked into random businesses…

Monika
…sat down and said “I'm going to wait until something breaks because I know I’ll be able to fix it for you.”

Gabe
It was pretty much, I would wait for a little bit, try to start a conversation but when it really came down to it and the tried to get me out of the door, it was “you cannot tell me there's not something that drives you nuts about that stupid little computer in front of you, and if I can solve that problem, then let me talk to your boss or whatever. If not, then you'll never hear from me again and I'm out of here.”

Nick
That's really good. That’s bold.

Monika
That’s very bold!

Gabe
Nine times out of 10 I actually got a job that way. I didn’t want to, but I did. You got to do something that was a little crazy or outlandish, otherwise you’re just another guy waiting and waiting…

Monika
…except you’re not waiting inside the office, you’re waiting outside…

Gabe
..and I spent all my time Googling coffee shops and cigar shops and all the places where I thought my clientele might be hanging out and eventually we did well enough to where I could sell the business and do what I wanted to do. I was never really interested in maintaining computers or systems or being the guy that everybody hates because the only time they want to call you is when everything's going down.

Monika
Yeah, the IT guy is definitely one of the most hated guys…

Gabe
…and loved.

Nick
When they hate you they hate you but when they love you, they definitely love you. I like the whole ‘how he sat in…I know there is a problem.’ Normally I’d just get chased down and they’re like “didn’t you see the No Soliciting sign?” Yeah, I know. We can make one of flashes for you too.

Gabe
I am not soliciting. I’m sitting here and waiting for an appointment…

Monika
Because you’re going to need me shortly.

Gabe
For you, it’s just a lot of the networking and what works today vs. 10 years ago.

Nick
I’ve really been looking at a lot of the Content Marketing. Content is King, e-books, guides and stuff like that. I’m really going to be focusing on video this year. That's the one thing I see that the competition really isn’t doing…

Gabe
…you’ve got a face for video. You’ll be alright.

Nick
I think so. But content, video. In the past, it's a bit a lot of networking events, which those are really hit or miss. What I take away from networking events now, it's if I can meet…out of every 10 I go to if I can meet any one person or one group of people that really just click with who I am…that's how we met. I think that's what matters the most is when you make those relationships. I don't even go to them looking for business anymore. I just really go to maintain friendships and meet good people.

Monika
We’re definitely in the same boat there. We tried the networking thing and while they’re great they’re very hard for a B2B higher type of business. A lot of the people that go to the networking events are just starting off with their business. They're not ready for a business like yours or a business like ours. They're still in their infancy and trying to figure out what they're doing, for the most part. Sure, they know what they're selling but they’re still trying to figure out what they're doing.

Gabe
Yeah, a long ways from the equation of cost benefitting…

Monika
So you’re saying ‘Content Marketing’ and everything. Are you going to take advantage of advertising online too? How are you looking at the world of the web in terms of growing your business?

Nick
The world of the web in terms of growing the business…I am not a web designer, by any means. I don't like web design. That's why people hire guys like you and guys handle that stuff and then IT people, we handle the networks and if people could understand the difference, the would be awesome. So we're looking at the Content Marketing e-books, guides, how to pick a service provider…top 5 ways to secure your network so to speak. I'm not heavily focusing on Adwords just because they are very expensive. I've seen it go as high as $37-$38 bucks per click.

Monika
Ours is the the same…in the $40s.

Nick
That’s crazy. When you're bigger, that's easy. You can just pump those dollars out, no problem. When you’re smaller you’ve got to think outside the box.

Gabe
Well, I mean, you can think about it a couple different ways. You can leverage it. If somebody was within 5 miles of your shop…that's where the $30 starts making sense because you can tighten it in…then you know that your best customer calls between 10:00 and 12:00 or you only want to be available for after-hour calls…see that's when, again, if somebody’s going to call after hours, then that's where there might be the money that you can kind of sneak in and wedge out your competition because they're not going to be answering the phone. Also the second thing is knowing when the budgets dry up. Everybody’s got a budget number now in Adwords and if you if you tell your Adwords account that you don't want your budget to start kicking until maybe 3:30 at night, everybody else is pretty much dried up, so that $30 turns more into $12.

Nick
That's good. See, I didn’t know that.

Gabe
Some little tidbits for you. So Adwords…there’s always a way to make it work for you. If you give Google money, they’ll give you business, but yeah, we totally hear you. We have to find creative ways to afford our own Adwords account for that same reason.

Nick
I've been looking at heavily focusing on…I've also been looking at Facebook Ads as well…

Gabe
Put a cute kitten next to the computer and let its hair catch on fire, there you go. Boom! Facebook will push that puppy and it will be out there. You see what happens on Facebook…

Monika
…not on fire!

Gabe
OK, fine.

Monika
That’s a little morbid.

Nick
My thoughts are, drive that traffic to the site, initially, so pay for it with that quick blast and then get some sort of email address out of it and then do email marketing automation on the backend. That way you’re not constantly paying for the Adwords, but you make use of that traffic while you have it for that split second.

Gabe
I think we’re going to go ahead and cut to break. When we come back we’ll talk a little bit about re-marketing as well. There’s another little strategy that most people don't even talk about.

Nick
I’m learning stuff. This is what I’m talking about.

Monika
Ringer Radio. We’ll be back.

{Commercial Break}

Gabe
Alright, welcome back to Ringer Radio. This is Gabriel Meacham with Monika Meacham and our special guest, Nick Black. We’re talking about all things gross and the Internet, flaming kittens and stuff like that. So we’re going to jump right back in. We got a little bit sidetracked on the whole idea of “what do you have to do on Facebook to make an impact and whatnot?” Over the break we were talking about some of the horror stories of things that we found in people's computers. I think Nick’s got one that will take the cake.

Monika
It sounds like this is the reason why you didn't go for personal computer repair, but decided to go to the business route.

Nick
Yes, this was the final straw that broke the camel’s back. It was that bad...

Gabe
We’ll help you through it.

Nick
I get a call and the person goes “yeah, you know, it's running really slow, really sluggish and you know, it's my personal laptop yadda, yadda, yadda…could you fix it? Could you take care of it?” I said “no, really residential isn't exactly where I want the business to be.” I mainly wanted it commercial, but at the time we were still taking the stuff. We were growing and we needed the income. After this it was no more personal, no more residential. So I get from him and it’s just really nasty on the outside, kind of had some weird stains and stuff that you don't really know where that's been and I said “no worries”. I open it up and it is really slow and I hear a crunching, grinding sound on the inside, so the first thing I thought was hard drive platters are going bad or maybe it's the fan or whatever the case is. It was the fan…it definitely was. All of a sudden I see a tiny, little baby roach come out of the laptop. It’s a laptop!

Gabe
It’s a laptop with roaches in it.

Nick
People hold these in their bed and all that stuff. It’s a laptop with roaches in it.

Monika
More than 1?

Nick
One came out, 2 came out and all of a sudden, I took the thing and I chucked it into the garage so quickly because it was late and I said “I’ll bring it home and I’ll work on it from home and then I’ll wrap it up and get it back out.” Then all the sudden {noise} and they were swarming in there. They came out full-fledged.

Monika
Oh my Gosh, they made a home in the laptop?

Nick
They made a nest inside of the laptop.

Monika
How dirty does a laptop have to be to…

Nick
…one with strange stains on it, obviously.

Gabe
I’ve seen like peanut butter in the…like a kid…

Nick
I haven’t seen that one.

Gabe
A customer called me because his kid put a peanut butter sandwich in the CD drive and he couldn’t get it to working ever again. I said ‘you’re going to have to buy another one. I’m sorry.’ But never that. You see the stuff online about the box computers, but a laptop…

Nick
…it's a laptop. I've seen spiders in the tower…

Gabe
Without divulging too much information. What did you end up doing, just like come get your crap?

Nick
I still went through and finished the job off.

Gabe
Whaaat?

Monika
Did you open up the computer and see the nest and everything?

Nick
I didn’t open it up. I just kind of put it in its own little containment center…

Gabe
Did you open up little roach motel on the bottom?

Nick
I should have, but no because I've been always so focused on quality and giving the best, no matter what, I went through and…

Gabe
…that’s a big “no matter what”…

Nick
I even sprayed it out and it was a mess…it was a total mess. I actually told the guy “look, that’s it. I’m done.”

Gabe
…I don’t want anymore of your nasty computers…

Monika
Did you charge him and upcharge for the roaches?

Nick
I actually didn’t. I thought about it, but I said ‘no, the price is the price. We’re going to be done with it.’ But what was funny was he said ‘no, it’s not my computer, it’s my girlfriend’s computer.’ I said ‘you need a new girlfriend, buddy because that does not work.’ Terrible, oh my gosh it was…til this day…

Monika
Do you know what her apartment looks like? If there’s roaches coming out of her computer…

Gabe
That’s a possessed computer.

Nick
That’s one you just chuck in the trash. Like ‘oh, I need the data off of it.’ NO! That was nasty and then about 2 cans of Raid later and being paranoid seeing just the slightest bug fly through the house, it was a mess.

Gabe
I’ve been real lucky like that. I don’t think I’ve ever had anything like that. I’ve got a similar story just starting out, going out to somebody's house and the dude tried to lock me in his house with him.

Nick
Are you serious?

Gabe
Yeah. I wasn’t have that. “I’m out!” I heard the door click by me and lock behind me he’s like “the computer’s right over here” and he touched me on the shoulder. I gotta go!

Monika
Horror stories of being an IT professional.

Gabe
IT guys have a very tough…we’re subject to a lot of things.

Monika
Are you sure it’s that you’re subject to things or that generally IT guys don't really communicate…

Gabe
…we’ll do anything for money, that’s what it comes down to?

Monika
No, it’s really that y’all are nerds, for the most part and have a hard time communicating with others.

Gabe
No, I can communicate to you firmly. I did not want that. I did not need to put that in my contract that no, you cannot lock me up with you.

Nick
No means no, Pal.

Monika
Anyway, that actually reminds me…no means no…there’s this new series of videos going out…I don’t know if you guys have had a chance to see it. It just started yesterday. It’s a lady that’s starting a “no means no” campaign and she has these videos running of the men and women parts that would communicate with each other. It’s a really interesting video. A hand with a breast…I hope I’m allowed to say that on the radio, but yeah…different ones like that saying “no means no”.

Nick
You’re looking on the dark part of YouTube.

Monika
It was on Facebook and it was a news channel that actually is the one that put it out because she's trying to make a big thing about “no means no”. I guess she's trying to do something big, socially. It's a non-profit organization that she's trying…

Nick
…that's good. I could see it.

Monika
Not to digress but y’all said “no means no” and I saw that today.

Gabe
We’re going to go on full nerd gear. What do you think the future looks like? Are we all going to be walking around with goggles in the next 5 years and just being done with the outside world, stuck in our computer going {sounds}? What's up?

Nick
How far do you want to go? Ten, 20, 30, 40?

Gabe
Let’s just go in the immediate future…10 years. The computer, as an appliance, has to go away. I mean you’re wearing it on your wrist at this point. They’re so small that…

Monika
Yeah, Google glasses is also there. All those different…

Nick
I think we’re going to end up with more, kind of like, tablets with docking stations like the Surface Books and stuff like that…

Monika
…where it’s actually a laptop and a tablet…

Nick
I think that’s where we’re going with it. I think everybody is going to be…this sounds really creepy but…as far as where analytics is going, big data and all that stuff…everybody's going to have a profile or their cookies, so to speak, and it's going to be crazy the amount of information you can pull off a somebody. It will be to the point where regular news advertising and media it's going to be the old way of doing things, just because you can't target somebody like you could with digital marketing in that sense and I just see it becoming more automated. Now it will be integrated…your personal cookie will be tied to your cell phone…

Gabe
…you know what’s interesting…we were talking about that…re-marketing…right before we left for the break. It’s the exact same thing, basically. You get somebody to come to your site 1 time, download a cookie, which is basically a serial number that follows you around for advertisers that describe your demographic…and now it's getting to the point…I don’t remember the exact acronyms, but those digital signatures are being traded in law by big companies. So not only do I not have to go to your site anymore, it's I can buy a list of the top 5,000 people that went to this section of Forbes or that went to this site, and I can buy that direct list and I can start re-marketing to them.

Monika
You can also market off of email addresses as well so you don’t necessarily have to have their IP addresses.

Gabe
Everywhere you go, your stinkin’ or display ad pops up.

Nick
It's going to be crazy, to the point where you got GPS enabled on your phone and you’ll be sitting out on a bus stop and there’s going to be an ad just for you. “Hey, Monika, before the bus gets here…”

Monika
Advertising is going to keep going and that's why I think it's interesting that a lot of people right now…not a lot but there are quite a few businesses out there that kind of blindly go and do advertising because they’re not in pay per clicks as high as our industries are. They’re in lower ones and there’s so much that 1 can do, they just don't realize the extent of it. Ten years ago, it was free to advertise online basically. For the most part, it was free. There was many ways of showcasing your business and everything and doing it for free. Now, if you really want to make traction, some industries, you really have to start paying for the space and doing the paid advertising.

Gabe
Or always the other around it is always have the absolute best content.

Monika
Absolutely.

Gabe
If you want to be the guy that is all about the forwarding DDOS attacks, explain to everybody exactly how a DDOS attack happens, who does it, what do they gain by it and be the authority on that 1 thing. That’s always still very significant because as much information as there is out there, it's still hard to find really solid, good information. You have to search through forums and all that. How much of your day is spent searching for an error code? You go through 50 different sites that tell you what that error code is and each one of them just represents and opinion.

Monika
We have to error out to break real quick. We’ll be back. Thank you everyone, for listening. We’ll be right back.

{Commercial Break}

Monika
Welcome back, Atlanta. This is Ringer Radio with Monika Meacham and Gabriel Meacham.

Gabe
Hello everybody.

Monika
Again, if you would like to leave us a message and have that question fielded, you can give us a call. Our number is 404-369-0738 or if you just want to Hire a Ringer you can call us at 404-369-0009. One thing I just wanted to point out to everybody as well, because we are doing the ribbon cutting, basically as we speak, we have some promotions going out for everyone in time for the ribbon cutting. A lot that we've heard recently is, people would love to get a customer package they just don't have the means to do so, financially. They're just not ready because generally they are a little bit more. So, we've come up with some really good entry packages for some website. They’re entry level, but they get you started on a custom website…

Gabe
It’s something that you’re not going to have to redo in 2 years.

Nick
It’s not a Wix site…

Monika
It’s not a Wix site. You own it.

Gabe
Once it’s paid for, it’s yours.

Monika
We’re doing a good payment plan with it, so that way people can have the ability to pay for it. We’re offering 16 months financing on these packages so…

Gabe
…limitations apply.

Monika
Then we also have a Digital Marketing promotion packages going on as well, a couple entry level ones. They’re going anywhere from managing local listings to Google Analytics and social management, as well as the traditional Webmaster tools, Webmaster type of services like updating a website and everything. So if you are interested give us a call: 404-369-0009.

Gabe
The other thing to mention on that is we do adopt sites. If you like the way your site looks and it just doesn't function the right way or maybe your web designer is in Alaska now and you can’t get ahold of him…a typical story that we heard is that he got hired over at CNN and now he doesn’t want anything to do with you…we will adopt your site, we’ll treat you better and you have to make huge reinvestment that way.

Monika
So again, we have Nick Black here with us, with America’s IT Doctors. Nick, before we forget, why don't we go over, what’s your web address and your phone number in case anybody’s looking for…they have a small business and they're looking for some help in the IT field?

Nick
It’s going to be americasITdoctors.com. So yeah, we’re going to be shortening that this year and phone number to reach us at…we love it when you call and just give us a all your technology problems and say “this doesn’t work!” and we’ll listen to you just listen…404-926-6481. Should I give out my email address? I don't know if I want the spam.

Monika
Awesome. So we’re at the tail end of our show. We’ve got a little bit more to go and we thought we’d see if you have any questions for us in terms of…you’re in a similar field…a little bit different still, in terms of the web development side of it…

Nick
…very different!

Gabe
Folks that don’t know any better would be like ‘oh I got a guy that works on computers so he can build a website’ or I got a guy that works on a website. He’ll build me a computer.’ No!

Nick
And I can tell you, IT people, normally we are not designers…it’s just how it goes. Every once in a while you get lucky with a Gabe where you had the IT company, but that's really not what you wanted to do. You wanted to be a designer and a developer so…

Gabe
I was IT by necessity only.

Nick
I like that. That’s good.

Gabe
So do you have any ideas, questions, comments, gripes, complaints, anything that you want to find out about.

Nick
This is good because I see it happen a lot and I think a lot of the listeners would actually benefit from this big time. So, a lot of times what always see is, people do a lot of advertising but they’ll just shoot it over to their main website instead of doing a sort of landing page. Do you see the benefits of that? I should have probably tossed together a landing page for this show.

Gabe
No, that’s one of my biggest gripes actually is dropping people on the homepage. It’s just bad character. If you know what they’re interested in then drop them on a page that caters to that interest. If you really think that you only have 1 user out there or all your customers are the same…you can just go down to the statistics of you're going to get much better overall self throughput and overall you know goal catching, if you drop people directly on the page that deals with what they're talking about it. Now, it’s typical that people will then circle out to the homepage to figure out who you are and kind of muddle around a little bit. We set up those kind of goals when we do the tracking on the site to kind of see where our average person walks around to before they finally make the purchase decision or click the contact button or whatever might be, but yes it’s really just bad form to drop somebody on a homepage.

Monika
Generally you have about 10-15 seconds to capture that person's interest, also so if they're not going to what they're looking for, for example, if you’re a candy shop and somebody puts in “chocolate chip cookies” and it's one of your 50 products and you go to the homepage and they don't see the chocolate chip cookie, well they’re going to go walk away because they’re looking for a chocolate chip cookie.

Gabe
Worse is some people just get lost in the…

Nick
It’s overwhelming…

Gabe
…how many times has that happened to you? You’re going out and you’re looking for a particular thing and you drop on to a site and the site’s awesome and everything, but next thing you know you're looking at 5 other things and you never actually accomplished what you wanted to do in the first place, which is get the darn thing…it’s just bad form is really what comes down to. There’s no right or wrong. It's kind of just lazy and bad form.

Monika
So either send them to the product where they are or build a landing page for your client…

Gabe
Landing pages aren’t really that hard. If you know who your client is and what they want to do, all you have to do is a 5-step formula: Identify who they are and let them know “hey I'm talking to you” Identify what your unique proposition to them is, why your product’s superior, what you can expect when you receive it and the last one is more of a how-to tell your friends or a spin or ad sell… That’s kind of like the 5-step easy landing page offers. This isn’t exactly what you’re looking for but maybe…the 5th step is “maybe you didn't want Chocolate Chip Cookies. Maybe you want Macadamia Nut Cookies or maybe you want Oatmeal Raisin Cookies…

Monika
…who wants an Oatmeal Raisin Cookie?

Gabe
…or what was that recipe your grandma did?

Nick
Oh, the Peaches and Gravy Cookie.

Monika
Southern…that’s for sure. We’ve had a fun show today as y’all can tell.

Gabe
So far, I think our tech here is like “we’ve got about 5 minutes of laughing and 3 minutes of content.

Monika
You’d think that there’s something in our water for this episode.

Gabe
Well Nick, getting down to brass tax, what are some of the areas that you service? What kind of customers are you looking for?

Nick
I feel so special. I'm looking for customers that enjoy long walks on the beach…

Monika
So they gotta be cute then right?

Nick
So actual cater area or service area…I don’t like the service area idea because we’re in the technology age and where we’re at at this point in time, you don't have to be in front of a machine 9 times out of 10 to support a client so…

Monika
You can log into the back end and take care of it.

Nick
Exactly, so if they’re in Florida, great. If they’re in California, awesome. If they’re in Hawaii, we want to see them in Hawaii because that is a “bizcation” as we call it, so anywhere they’re at in the continental US or, who knows, maybe something might pop up…

Gabe
{accent} we’re from the Ukraine and I have a computer…no roaches.

Nick
We only accept BIT Coin.

Gabe
So you’ll go just about anywhere…well you’ll log in just about anywhere to fix a computer, right?

Monika
But your business, overall, currently is located up in Gwinna area right?

Nick
Yes.

Monika
Again, what’s your web address and phone number for people to reach out to you?

Nick
America'sITdoctors.com and 404-926-6481. We love the questions. Give us a call when your cat is sitting next to your computer, on fire and we’ll call the fire department. There you go.

Monika
As long as they videotape it for you so you can put it up on Facebook, right?

Gabe
What about services like Data Recovery and stuff like that? What do you do there?

Nick
We usually farm that stuff out, just because once it gets to that point, where there's no coming back from it…and we always stress backups, like for example Crypto Locker, I’m sure a lot of us has heard of it…Crypto Locker, Crypto Ware…you know there's really no recovering that data afterward, so you need to rely your backup. So we always just tell everybody…

Monika
…is that part of the service you offer is doing backups for your clients?

Nick
Yes, it’s all included. We even provide the device to do backups in.

Gabe
Really? We need to talk because I’ve lost a lot of stuff this last year.

Monika
Gabe lost his backup and his main one…

Gabe
I cried for like 3 days. I finally got some of it back but my computer caught on fire.

Monika
Yeah, it caught on fire. It was interesting.

Nick
Are you serious? You should have recorded that.

Monika
Yeah, nobody’s ever heard of that before. It started smoking. It was really interesting.

Gabe
And it burned out 3 drives that were connected to it via serial.

Nick
…are you kidding me?

Monika
He’s got bad luck.

Gabe
Anyway, I think we’re pretty much out of time, so until next week…

Monika
Again, everyone, Ringer Radio. If you’re looking for me or Gabe in terms of our services you can always get to www.hirearinger.com and you can give us a call as well: 404-369-0009. If you’re on Holcomb Bridge right now, go ahead, stop on by, come say “hi” to us, play a game of pool and maybe get a drink. Our address is 2660 Holcomb Bridge Rd., Suite 214. It’s across the street from the Target in the __ Shopping Center.

Gabe
…and future Gabe, you’re awesome! Thanks for listening. Bye.

Read 1485 times Last modified on Wednesday, 18 May 2016 15:12

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