Monday, 14 November 2016 10:06

Ringer Radio Episode 23

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RINGER RADIO


With

Monika and Gabriel

And

JEREMY, ROBERT, DAN AND CHRISTINA.

Announcer

Business owners, in today's world your website is often the first impression you make on many potential customers, clients and partners. So how do you make that impression last? Join us for the next hour on Ringer Radio, as Gabriel and Monika Meacham go over all the details to help you do just that. Ringer Radio, brought to you by Ringer Consulting Group. For more information visit hirearinger.com

Monika

Hello Atlanta and welcome to Ringer Radio. We have here me, Monika Meacham and Gabriel Meacham with us.

Gabe

Hello people, how are the people of the land today?

Monika

They're not going to reply to you.

Gabe

No, never.

Monika

No.

Gabe

But that's kind of the clever joy of our show as we just, you know, we happen to know that the people that like us, like us and the ones that don't, don't listen. So I guess we will just go from there.

Monika

OK we'll just go from there.

Gabe

Yeah.

Monika

Alright well today guys. We got … we decided to do an in-house show for you guys today. Where we're actually … it's the whole ringer … well, part of the ringer group, is with us today. And you know, we wanted to talk about different things. Help you out with your business. Maybe give you some insight, some tips, some things like that basically.

Gabe

And if you can see the site we have in here, what we really have is like six people gathered around two microphone all huddled over the top of each other.

Monika

It is a good thing we like each other.

Gabe

Yeah, yeah, yeah. You got to be a close team to pull this off

Monika

Yeah. Absolutely. So I'm going to introduce everybody. Some of you guys have heard of the people before because they've come on other shows with us. We have Jeremy here with us, who's a systems programmer. We have Robert here with us. We have Robert here with us and he …

Robert

Robert

Hey there.

Monika

He's our web development in charge of … director of web development. And then we have Dan here with us, who is our senior content strategist.

Dan

Hello everybody

Monika

And we also have Christina here with us who is our intern. She's an intern developer with us here that recently started actually.

Christina

Hello.

Gabe

She’s (laughing) got lots of words to say.

Monika

So you know it just sort of… today we want to … I wanted to do a public service announcement just because I got this email this morning. I, you know, sometimes when you're in the B to B world, you go and you find different areas where you can actually bit on work. And I did that yesterday and I bit on a piece of work and I got an email back and when I got the e-mail back I went, “I've seen this e-mail before, why am I getting this e-mail”. This is one of those emails …

Gabe

Am blind, deaf and dumb and do you take credit cards.

Monika

Yeah exactly.

Gabe

It’s that same one.

Monika

It's that one e-mail that some business owners get where they're … where you know, it sounds fishy … something weird is going on. They say that they can't talk to you over the phone. They can't have a conversation with you and that they want to know whether or not you take credit cards.

Gabe

I got to say you know, there is a possibility that there's this poor guy out there that really is blind and you …

Monika

No not on this one because I researched it. And that's what I want to talk to you guys about. There is ways to research. You know, if you get an e-mail that just seems a little funny don't open it. Don't open the attachments, don't follow the links, go and research it. Because ten times out of norm, it's already been caught as a scam. And when you put in either the e-mail address that it comes from or some of the big keywords. Like for example this one wanted me to go to a website called www.agroamerica.com because that's the site they wanted to replicate. You know, and I went and I looked at that and I pulled up that site because I've seen this e-mail before. Immediately says e-mail scam that has been going after the Web Development Community for you know, two to three years. Where essentially they send you a check, the check is fraudulent but they end up getting your account numbers, your bank account numbers because of it. Why people want to aim at poor little web developers because there's a lot of poor little lot of developers out there. I think is wrong but overall there's other scams as well

Robert

Sure.

Monika

And Robert,

Robert

Yeah. yeah, unfortunately.

Monika

you can talk to this unfortunately as well.

Gabe

I had to blow up his computer by following some instructions that came from an email

Robert

Well So I got an e-mail and it was somebody going, “hey I am, am in your industry and I really like your Website. Here's my resume”. And I'm like, “OK, I'll just click on the resume”. You know, and I clicked on it and then it's like a pdf doc or a Word document or something like that. And I … and then it says, “Oh you need to enable editing content in order to see the content”. And so I think you know, I'm not really thinking it's early in the morning. And so I do that and then it says, “Oh you need enable macros”. And so I do that and by this time I now realize that I have messed up because It finally hit me what I was doing. It was early in the morning. You know, very first thing checking my emails …

Gabe

Drinking coffee

Robert

Right. Just trying to wake up you know and

Monika

And it killed your computer for how long?

Robert

It took me two days of trying to get the virus out of it and I finally had to just reformat the whole thing. And take out all my files and put it onto a hard drive and then just move everything over but it took two days …

Monika

And you know what you're doing. So somebody … if this happens to somebody who doesn't necessarily know as much about the computer world or how to work around it. You know, how to do a lot of stuff with their computer. I mean that can screw them up for a week, two weeks or a month, who knows. Where they may not …

Robert

They have to go get somebody else … somebody involved.

Monika

So yeah, just overall public service announcement. I mean, there's many ways to see you know. If something just sounds fishy, if they're asking to open up an e-mail. If the e-mail address doesn't come from a true domain, you know. A lot of times those are other ways …

Robert

Gmail

Robert

Yeah. Email addresses, yahoo address things like that.

Gabe

We ignore those all together because I mean, there is still some …

Robert

Legit stuffs.

Monika

And also, the biggest one of all folks, you not related to some royalty that you didn't know you were related to before that's coming out of the woodworks and wants to give you all of their fortune. It's not real.

Gabe

And there's no prince over somewhere in South Africa that wants to send you a million dollar check so you can cash it and send them back five hundred thousand dollars. It just doesn't happen, sorry. And while we're talking about the myths of the Internet. Let's kind of get in the meat and potatoes of what we want to talk about today. It is you know, there's. Let's just dive right into one of the myths of the Internet. I mean. How has that changed ten years ago? A guy that was smart gets online puts up a Website, decides to sell Q. tips as a million dollars in his pocket six months later. I think that's one of the big myths of the internet especially you know, today.

Robert

You can't just get on the Internet and make ten million dollars right away.

Monika

You could before though, right? It happened at one point..

Gabe

I mean there's plenty people out there. I mean if you're an early adopter and you were the first guy on the scene selling …

Robert

The “dot com’ers” did it for sure.

Gabe

Yeah. If you're the first guy on the scene selling something. Then yeah, you're going to make money but the truth is there's been so much individuals that have made businesses and then along and also big companies have come along and said, “oh wow you've identified all my little market segments that I haven't captured on”. The next you know, K- Mart selling firecrackers off their website. Making it hard for anybody else to do, you know what am saying. If the big companies recognize those opportunities and they put their developers to ensure in modern, like today's world. You really have to have something …

Robert

And they don't come around to the smaller companies anymore and just buy them out like it used to be.

Gabe

Now it's just too easy just to say, yeah, you got a good idea here but I cannot advertise you.

Robert

Right.

Gabe

Whereas before you know, you could be an advertiser and still going on scene. But that's the other thing now is the method of free advertising online. It just online, it is no longer the free option of advertising.

Robert

Sure

Gabe

Now it is the most effective.

Robert

Well that is because that is where everybody is.

Gabe

Exactly. It is most effective but it is no longer free … it's a pay to play game.

Robert

Sure.

Gabe

And I think that's what most people, you know. If they have a myth in their head. It's I'm going to pop online, I'm going to make me a million dollars, I'm going to exit the market, I'm going to go live on a beach somewhere. It just does happen anymore

Robert

And that kind of goes into our next myth that we hear about is that “I can get you number one listing on Google.” What do you think about that?

Gabe

I think that you know … gosh there are … luckily Google has made it to where that whole market has went away.

Robert

Sure.

Gabriel There was a bubble for about three, four years, where there were things that you can do to quote, unquote, trick the search engines. Like they would have been big ol’ link rings that you know as being part of that link ring... Monika But I want to point out you said trick.

Gabe

Yeah and that's the point, is they were there to trick the indices or trick the algorithm in the search engine. And it's little things people figured out that really I mean Google invested a lot of money into swashing and figuring out how to get those like kinks in the law worked out if you will.

Robert

Sure.

Monika

Because they don't want you to check, they want you to actually work hard. They want you to be legit.

Gabe

Right.

Robert

They want you to have the best quality content that’s king.

Monika

And unique. Unique quality content. Right?

Gabe

Well and then you know. And the next question is well, how do you know who's the best or what's the best and you know I think that's what. When we get back from this commercial segment. We should dive right into is you know, what makes good quality content. And I think that's why we have the whole team here because we as a business even realize one person in this dev shop will not make good quality content. Really …

Robert

It takes a team

Gabe

At this point in time to go against your competitors. It really is it takes a team of people that one can write a good dialogue and can write a good pitch. And then to the person that can take that and go, “How do I make that a visual thing and you know, put that on the page”. And then three it takes the technicians to be able to go, “OK, well you know, how do we take that art that just came from art boy Gab and turn that into you know, code that actually works”. It's going to work across fifty different browsers and you know, that kind of thing. It takes a team and I think that's the last thing that we deal with as a myth of the idea of the solo entrepreneur out there that built a website. And now there's you know, that residual income is still coming in and those stories are getting fewer and fewer.

Monika

Well this is a big subject, so let's take a quick break real quick. When we get back we'll talk a little bit more about this and we will be right back. Ringer Radio.

***COMMERCIAL BREAK***

Gabe

Hello Atlanta welcome back. You're listening to news talk eleven sixty in Atlanta and you are currently listening to me on Ringer Radio. I'm Gabriel Meacham. I'm here with Monika Meacham and we've got a really cool show. We've got everybody in our office, well minus a couple of interns. Everybody in our office and all the microphone today. So yeah. We were, we were just talking. You know … I know we were really just talking about the myths behind what was true two years ago, three years ago.

Monika

More than that. Like ten years ago.

Gabe

And what is not true today.

Monika

Right.

Gabe

And kind of the mark of a pro … I mean the internet all sudden became cool like three years ago. I mean …

Monika

More the three years, like ten years ago.

Robert

Not really, not really. If you think about it five years ago the conversations was why do I need a website.

Gabe

Exactly.

Robert

Now everybody understands that they need a website.

Monika

I think if it is the smartphone that really gave the Web the biggest boost in many ways. I think it's when the smart phone came out.

Robert

It could be argued.

Monika

Time frame, maybe not.

Gabe

Maybe everybody figured out that, hey this is the place where all the information is. I could see that.

Robert

Now the conversation for companies is, how do I get my Website to sell? Right. And that that kind of leads into our myth conversation.

Gabe

A lot of that is just because there's so much more competition there used to be, the markets have been segmentized. You know, a lot of stuff now whereas you know we could say, “Hey we're the best Joomla developers in the world” three years ago and get all kinds of Jooma work now. Really it's about localization because you know Google is trying to match you with the closest possible Jooma expert rather than who's the one out there saying it the most. That makes sense? So that's kind of one of those things I think Dan did you have a prospective?

Dan

You know we both just touched upon like a very interesting moment. Joomla. Who knows what that means out there, and now there might be a third of you that do. Maybe even half of you I'd say, but still they'll be a segment out there that doesn't understand what we just said. And that's the interesting part of what goes on. While the internet is now provided with a platform that's much more generous and much more business oriented. There are many people who use the web or use the Internet and don't know what the tools are. And that's why there's a very important issue that everyone should think about in that's concept. You know conceptually, “What do we mean?” and it's truly gets to a point to where content is truly concept. It's an idea that must be shared and understood by the many who are on the on the website and on the Internet.

Monika

Right and for those of you out there that don't know much about Dan. Dan's been with us a couple months now. Dan has a huge history, a huge background in advertising. He's been with big advertising firms, been in the space, been in the marketing space, and been in this overall area for twenty, thirty years now. Right? You know and he got to watch the … or he had to move with times as you know advertising shifted as it went from the common media platform to this digital platform. And had to adapt to it and see the change.

Gabe

And I think that's why he's with us now. You know,

Dan

Yeah, that is indeed why I'm with Ringer because so many outfits proposed to understand and give you, you the audience out there the individuals who are running businesses advice and indeed take you to a website and make the website function. And guess what? Sell your product. Well sell doesn't necessarily have anything to do with coding or legitimized the thing or legitimize the things that you need done. So practicality has to become part of this sophisticated structure and practicality changes content again. What does that mean? Well get an idea make everybody understand it and sell your product.

Gabe

Exactly. And it used to be that a great website could be something that was technically great. That actually said nothing, and I think That’s where we're getting into. In the web design industry is we're getting closer and closer and closer to the actual advertising industry. Learning what they figured out the last sixty years and going, you know what? Sometimes it's better to keep it simple, have a concise thought and have four or five different websites based on what campaign and who your end customer is. And that makes more sense than having this big Goliath website that takes care of all my customers with one because that's just one of the things that we draw from old media. Is you dissect things and you put, compartmentalize people and you give them exactly what they're looking for. You sell them on just that aspect and then you know, then it goes into nurturing the client and that's when you go to your big site stuff like that. We're seeing a lot of those old trends become what should be common knowledge and that's only because the web is now gotten to the point of … it's the most legitimate platform for selling a productive particular product or service. And we're going back to what worked before for these clients in older medians does that make sense.

Dan

And video is kind of interesting an astounding portion of web construction now.

Gabe

Yeah absolutely. It's. It's almost an essential part of any I mean just about every Website we put together features video in some way or another. I know that when we push out a website. We're pushing out five or six different videos. One about how we made the website because that's just for our general purpose. That's how we show what we.. you know … we like to show people what goes on under the hood. And then also for the client you know, usually we wrap some videos with them as well to push that out on the social world. Just to say, hey here’s a big ole Billboard about the website we just launched.

Monika

Yeah, I mean it's definitely an important area for us because we're constantly investing in that area as well. That's one that we believe in that needs the investment side to. You know, to be able to give our clients whatever we can with that. You know, a recent purchase includes a couple aerial drones. Because we have clients where it would be perfect for them to get aerial footage of their land and what they have and things like that in order to give them a better edge and give them some content really that people love to watch.

Gabe

That's kind of why our job has changed. We've grown from a simple. We're really good at putting together code. Two we're really good at putting together campaigns which basically means we come up with a lot of you know we meet with our clients, we come up with some good ideas with them. We tell them, hey, look we can take care of this portion. And that's why one, we invest in stuff that most web design companies would never even think of. You know, we've got a full green screen studio. So we can do on the fly videos featuring the customers and/or us. And we bring in actors. Like you said we do the drone thing just as one more thing that we can offer our clients to kind of add production value to something that you know, It used be, you spend twenty, thirty thousand dollars on, now we can get it done in a day. And it's just … exactly. I mean it's …

Robert

It’s a team effort and that's kind of where we're you know, you really have to have a team to be able to do all those kinds of things. If you're going to actually survive in the big advertising world going against your top competitors.

Gabe

Yeah. Absolutely, I guess we need to take a second just to say OK so what makes up the team and why have we kind of not said we want thirty developers. Our team up is made up of more of we've got developers, we've got you know, content strategist. We've got H.T.M.L. gurus we've got marketing professionals and business professionals all kind of under one roof. And it makes up an odd little team but I think it's a kind of team that makes us very competitive for our customers. Because really the under one roof. You're not going to find the same kind of mix if you will. So let's go around, I mean Robert. From your perspective, how do you play a role in the overall? We're going to go do a little round table.

Robert

Yes. Sure, sure. So I think my biggest role is just kind of helping our… basically helping our staff whether it's our graphic designers or coders or our content strategists. To kind of glue all of you together under one thought and make sure that everything is all one thought. And helping all of you communicate properly and I think that's my biggest role here is just really …

Monika

As well as leading the interns and kind of getting them on board in many as well too.

Robert

Sure. Yeah, I've been … It takes a team you know there's not one person in here that has expertise in all things. So and I think being that glue guy has really kind of been my role here.

Gabe

Yeah. Absolutely.

Monika

Well I think that's what's unique about Ringer is that we do have the expertise. Every individual has their own expertise and that's what makes us a more powerful engine in many ways because there are you know different expertise that glue together with glue and everything like that.

Gabe

So OK this one will be probably pretty quick because I know this guy right. He's the quintessential coder in the office and my prediction he's got ten words.

Jeremy

Yeah I pretty much just work on the back and you know make everything functionally. I don't do anything to make it look pretty. Gabriel You're not a pretty guy.

Jeremy

I will give you basic Bootstrap and H.T.M.L and make everything work amazingly on the back that no one really gets to see.

Gabe

So he's a …

Robert

You can match up design pretty well.

Jeremy

Yeah I mean I can matches designs. Would make work is what I'm pretty much good for.

Gabe

You know every business has the guy in the closet that you hear hacking in the middle of the night. Yeah that's Jeremy for us.

Jeremy

Mechanical keyboard.

Monika

[Laughs]. Well before we continue at the team. Actually we need to take a quick break and then we'll continue from there. So go ahead and listen to these commercials and we will be right back.

Robert

Ringer radio.

***COMMERCIAL BREAK***

Monika

Welcome back Atlanta this is Ringer Radio again with Gab and Monika Meacham. So again you know, if you're listening out there you know, we're doing a little bit of a different show today. Going over our team, going over who we are at Ringer, you know. Trying to give some tips and advice when it comes to the Web world. If you have any needs and you actually want to sit down and talk with the ringer, feel free to give us a call our number is 404-369-0009. You can also check us out on the web at www.hirearinger.com. So you know we're just going to jump right back into it. We were talking about teams before and we were talking to Jeremy and Robert about you know, how they play a role in their teams and what they do here. So

Gabe

Yeah. And this seems like a very self-serving episode of Ringer Radio. But the truth is most the time we are interviewing other businesses, we thought that it would only be fair if we gave ourselves an opportunity to interview ourselves.

Robert

Yeah. Fair to us, for sure.

Gabe

Yeah exactly. So I've been talking to Dan quite a bit about some of the things that really have changed over time. I guess …

Dan

Well the one thing that's quite important and hasn't changed a bit and that is strategy.

Robert

Sure.

Dan

And the thing that we have is a lock on strategy. Because we don't go in and say, hey guess what? We're going to fix your IT proponents here and make it just perfect. We're going to do it and design the hell out of this thing and it's going to sing like you never heard it sing before. No, it's a strategy. Like what is the problem? What are we trying to solve?

Gabe

Exactly

Dan

What one of our abilities are we going to employ to solve your problem?

Gabe

Right. We would much rather dissect the problem than just say I'm going to throw a big old design mandate on this and think that it's going to work.

Robert

Or a package idea from like a lot of other companies we see have like …

Gabe

Exactly.

Robert

This two hundred dollars package will get you this.

Dan

I wondered you know Gab you might address the Goza strategy a bit. Just somewhat because it plays a different role in what we normally do. Visually what you've done …

Gabe

Yeah. With that we really wanted you know, the Goza team came to us and they wanted a website that was completely different than people had seen before. And you know, just that alone is something that's hard to accomplish. Because, I mean unless you draw …

Robert

It is an idea, it is on the web.

Gabe

Yeah. Exactly. I mean there's so many things that are already out there and so you have to obey the laws of the browser. We can't just say, OK well I'm going to do some crazy flash thing because flash isn't supported anymore. So we have …

Robert

No dancing Jesus?

Gabe

No dancing Jesus. You got to stay within that kind of the rule books or the lines of what browsers will support. So we went and we scouted out some really cool Java components that is in some interesting things with the front end UX layout. And it was stuff that impressed us enough that we were able to look at it and even though the samples that we saw were really rudimentary, we could kind of see that how we could play to their brand strength and utilize those technologies. So we were able to then in the end deliver something that one, It something that you don't see that often. And then two that allowed us to implement, like a Choose Your Own Adventure type thing with a website. Which is something that that we wanted to identify that you know, they do have a core demographic. But they mostly fall under these three scenarios and we wanted to give a snapshot of … we identify with you. The couple that stays at home, you. The six friends that party at the house and just chill out and it's all good. And you are the bachelorette that's going around and having the time of her life. It's not the typical Budweiser beer commercial you put the pretty lady on it and call it a day. It took something like you know, they knew that they had a different customer base. And they're going after … so we want to slight the website and everything we did in that direction.

Dan

But the one thing it definitely did that makes it unique and different for people in our trade is that we made it a brand. Everything that touched upon the website also spoke to this brand.

Gabe

Right.

Dan

And that's something that is not often seen by people in our department.

Gabe

Sure. [Silence]. OK. So when the room goes silent you pretty much know the topic is dead. So the next topic we have written down is, we want to do a little bit of. What future Gab action here. I want to fast forward and this is going to. You know, we're probably the closest to the industry. We see it every day. This is all we do every day is work with the Internet. All different … in every different fashion. So for us to go …let's think ahead a little bit. In two years what is going to be the common theme? Or in four years, what is going to be the median by which the web is used? And I personally feel like the web is going to move off the screen and it becomes you know, you've got branches in two ways. You've got … everything is connected to the web in one way or the other. Which is you know, that's all great to a point you don't want your refrigerator telling you what to eat. But then there's also you know, I think within the immediate future, the next couple of years, market's going to be flooded with headsets. And that brings all of the content off of the screen in front of you and requires the content now be able to be cast anywhere around you. Kind of like you know, we've all seen like the cool Microsoft commercials and what not with…

Robert

With the halo lens?

Gabe

Yeah with the halo lens and I guess the immediate objection is like wow Google Glass and you know it failed horribly. But I'll say with Google Glass all they were doing was putting flash cards up in your upper right peripherals.

Robert

That’s right.

Gabe

It wasn't actually putting contextual images in it. You know, putting it on the wall around you. Around you or holograms around you and stuff like that and …

Monika

Then like how can you know, how can you navigate through it? I don't understand that. Like that's the one thing I keep hearing about this but how do you navigate? Like you can't touch the air.

Gabe

Well you can actually because the glasses actually have sensors that are sensing what your hands are doing. I mean, you've got the connects, right? The kids, millions of millions of millions of kids are playing video games that are very advanced. I mean, like super street fighter like crazy video games online. And that's scanning their whole body and that whole body is measuring an input that is precise.

Robert

Very precise.

Gabe

Exactly

Monika

So in many ways this technology already exists.

Gabe

The technology already exists. It is about you know, adoption. You got the smartest players in the world. I mean Mark Zuckerberg bought.. The moment he saw it, he bought the Halo lens technology… And … I'm sorry that's not correct. It is Oculus Rift that he bought. And then Microsoft is right behind Oculus with the halo lens. Which you know, it's going to be expensive at first but …

Robert

They just lost a developer edition that is like three thousand dollars.

Gabe

Yes, it's retarded but at first all of these things have become expensive and then you get the early adopters. But the really, the early adopters are only figuring out how to create content before the later adopters.

Robert

Right.

Monika

So let's talk a little bit more for our folks out there the listening because how is this going to affect their business. It's you know, we're talking you know, entrepreneurs are out there listening to us, wondering how they need to change their business How they need to conform for selling online. Well how is this going to affect them and what should they start thinking about?

Gabe

Well I think you know, it won't be long before you'll be sent a little drive or a link to something you put your drive on. And you put your goggles on and you know, you can see the room around you. I mean it is clear and transparent. You can see the room around you. You know, everything will change as you as shift through the room and you walk around what not and it may free you up from having to have a computer all together. But it allows that you know, somebody can send you a quick little snippet. Which is then as a hologram that gives you a sales presentation of exactly why you want what they are selling.

Robert

So that’s what you see the web kind of going ….

Gabe

Yeah I see it being both. It is augmented like, I think that within a short amount of time you'll be scrolling down a website and then they'll be a little icon, that's like got little 3D goggles on it. And you click on that damn icon and then you know, you're beams the content to your goggles. And now you're looking at the page and you're looking at … you're able to take all the elements of the page click on it and then hold it in your hand. And go I like this, this is really cool.

Robert

Like … kind of like 3D web. Is that what you are talking about?

Gabe

A little bit like that.

Robert

Oh Man. I think 3D web is probably. I think would be the coolest thing, is to have a website that is.. has 3D animations that come out into your real world using the halo and technologies that are coming out.

Gabe

If you want to do a little research I mean if you wanna do a little research, VMRL has been around forever and ever and ever. There's all kinds of 3D software platforms, all the gaming software that's really like, what is it, unity five right now. You can go in and you can create objects in unity five and already export them as Oculus objects. So export them as Halo objects and you just then have to tell it OK how you want that object to interact with the person around it. Now all of these things are not of course mainstream yet. Just because it's still really in its infancy.

Robert

It’s new.

Gabe

And you know is there any guarantee that people are actually going to put stuff on their head to do business that way. I'd say no there's no guarantee but it's the same thing as like, when video came out you know, in large force. Well it replaced the websites. No it's not going to replace a website, it's just going to augment …

Robert

A really awesome, unique flavor to it…

Dan

Exactly and if you're going to have awesome, you're going to have idea. And even that you're proposes to be, the application of an idea that uses the instrument. And that's where we, I think understands what we are doing here.

Monika

Well with that said, we need to take another quick break and we'll be right back. Ringer Radio.

***COMMERCIAL BREAK***

Robert

Hello Atlanta you're listening to Ringer Radio on the news talk eleven sixty AM. If you want to find out more about us. You can visit us online, www.hirearinger.com. And our phone number is 4043690009. I was trying to give out my cell phone number to y'all but I don't think you want it.

Monika

As a point we do give those out to our clients but not on the radio.

Robert

Sorry, sorry.

Gabe

Yeah that went over well. Alright so gosh you know, we have covered so much in such a little time. And usually we like to give our listeners something that there's actionable, something they can in.. we've been kind of talking in theory quite a bit. So really what I want to do is get a round table from us … from us here. What is our absolute best advice for you know, maybe the, again we're trying to always talk to the young entrepreneur and feel like if you were to listen to the show. Thus far you would think you know, the young entrepreneur. It's over but I believe this. I believe that the young entrepreneur that's out there, that's willing the hustle those who want to put together a team. That's willing to be a good business person and leverage other people's talent. They you know, is no, It's not as easy as it was three years ago but it's a heck of a lot easier than it was ten years ago, twenty years ago and thirty years ago. Thirty years ago, I mean there was no such thing as crowd funding. If you had a good business idea you had to find somebody in your family that had money.

Monika

Or an angel investors and or something. Or something like that and pay ridiculous fees on this and that the other now, I mean if you can articulate your idea and you can draw it out really well. You can … there's tons of places you can go crowdfunding and almost instantly getting the money you need to start getting prototypes done in this. So in that way, I think you're living in the easiest environment we've ever had to create a business. But it's not the wild, Wild West anymore, where anything goes. It's you know, you've got to know something about business you've got to know something about your customers. You have to know something about proper marketing and proper advertising.

Robert

And you have to know yourself, you've got to do … have to know yourself and who your client actually is going to be.

Gabe

Exactly. So you know with that said, the encouragement is you know. There is no better time if you're … if you've been sitting on an idea and it's just like you feel like it's time to birth it, there is no better time to jump in the market with it.

Monika

So what would you suggest to that person, I mean is the Website the first thing they go do is social the first thing they do, is setting up a retail shop... I mean, it depends, right?

Gabe

Yes, yes and yes I mean. First you do everything you can do yourself.

Robert

That's right.

Gabe

Until you either run out of time or you run out of resources. Or you just hit a wall where you just can't get any more done past yourself. Then you start shopping for your team and if that means you know you're going to hire the talent in or you're going to partner with a company like us. That's going to partner with you, provide you that part time team. If you will you know, you're taking a portion of our week to work on your stuff. I mean then that's the next evolutionary step. Past that, you know then it becomes marketing and proper advertising and knowing the difference between the two …

Robert

And your strategy.

Gabe

And having a proper strategy to go to market. These are all just basic fundamental business things. But the reason we bring it up is there's been so much success in abstract of basic fundamental marketing and advertising and business logic in the last five years. I think that kind of is … that's a wash. That's going away. It's becoming very clear that you need to have those core skills. Otherwise you're going to be fighting a very tough fight.

Dan

And the real I think challenge too is being … demandingly, being single minded because the closer you are to a strategy statement as Robert suggested. And the closer you are to a product and what its profile is, Is the more success you'll have. The minute you get general and don't have a straightforward idea as to what your product gives to the world out there, You've kind of lost your style and your speed.

Gabe

Sure. Along with that I think the next, The next people.. have to tell people is, it's a tough concept but its patience. It takes their … success just doesn't quite happen. We've had three, four hundred clients shift through here in the last ten years. And we've seen you know, ten years ago somebody would have an idea. And then three months later they pull up in their Lambo going “woohoo look what I've done”. Now you can take somebody with the exact same idea and it's going to take four or five years to get all their ducks in a row because they have competition. They didn't have competition before. They have other people in the market playing and doing what you think. They've got you know, the IP that's out there. It's so much better than it was ten years ago. That you have to scream a whole lot louder to make the same amount of noise. And the biggest advice is patience.

Monika

I'd also say on top of that though with patience, they need to be reasonable and understandable that, you know, if you come up with a wonderful idea, that's an app let say, you have to think about it a little bit. Because it's not as easy as many people think you know, that if you want to get one created for example you have to be realistic. It takes time, you know. I get surprised by the amount of people that come in or we talk to that have this wonderful idea and they're like, “oh I got this app that I want to make and I want it done for a thousand dollars”.

Robert

Two hundred hundred dollars.

Monika

Right, right. You know when you're building for an apple there's a lot of programming going on back there. I mean if you get a quote from somebody saying that they're going to build something for two hundred dollars or a thousand dollars. Even a couple thousand dollars.

Robert

Throw it away.

Monika

Most of the time it's going to be … yeah, it's going to be throw away or it's not going to be written right, it's going to be corrupted to code or something else or it's going to be some …

Robert

Or you are going to pay him and you are never going to see the guy again.

Monika

Right.

Gabe

That happens all the time with that, I mean, it all comes down to you know, you have to have a clear thought going into the thing. And you have to have the wherewithal to see it out to its completion.

Robert

And be proactive. You know, really you have to get out there and you have to hustle.

Monika

You have to hustle.

Robert

You know that's, I mean. I think that's the biggest key for any business, any entrepreneur is, and you have to hustle. There's not one day out there that you're not going to wake up at six am and go to bed at you know, one, two o'clock in the morning. You know, you have to hustle especially when you're just starting up. If you're really serious about the product or service that you want to offer, you need to hustle. You need to get out there, you need to pound the pavement. And you meet people and get people to know who you are, what your product is and what your services is.

Gabe

Yeah and a big part of that honestly, a big part of that initial hustle is for the purpose of developing your team. Figuring out who your resources are, figuring out who's going to be able to bring what to the table. So you can serve a great dinner in the end.

Monika

And you know that's my biggest piece of advice that I would ever give any business owner, is your team. You have to make sure that you're there for your team the right way, in every way. Your employees for … you know, it's sad to look at corporate world and I came from corporate world, and you know corporate world looks at employees as if they're tissues, you know, in and out type of thing and that's an unfortunate thing. When you're an entrepreneur and you’re a business don't step on your employees you know, your employees are going to make or break you.

Robert

Well they represent you.

Monika

They represent you and they can make or break you. So if you teach treat them with disrespect, if you don't treat them well you know, things like that. You're never going to ever have a good product or service or it's going to be very difficult for you. You know, you've got to realize that they're in there with you too, they're taking that risk. They're part of your team and taking a risk because they know that you're a young company that who knows you know are you going to be there tomorrow or the day after. You know, they're there taking just as much risk as you are while you know, you're starting a business.

Dan

Philosophically, we're just touched upon there by Monika is the honesty and what we have to share with you if you come in here to Ringer. We'll tell you the hard truth and we will tell you the good truth as well. But we won't disguise it but we'll make it work.

Gabe

We're the only web design shop in Atlanta that will tell you your idea stinks. And that's that just, say, if your ideas sucks and we don't think it's marketable, plausible, meaning, hey you have, may have, the coolest little widget idea in the world.

Robert

And you may have the money for it.

Gabe

But at the end of the day if we don't think there's an audience and we can't be convinced there's a good audience for you that you have an end customer. Then we're just going to lay it on the line and be like ‘look, you know, I'm sorry we're taking our hat out of the ring. Just because we don't feel like, one, we will be able to find that audience for you, and deliver that message that you need delivered’…

Robert

And two, we don't want to disappoint you later.

Gabe

Right.

Monika

We also don't want them to waste their money either. I mean our success is driven by our client success. At the end of the day, we don't consider ourselves successful if our clients are not successful as well. And that's what we're in business to do. We're in business to help our clients be the most successful business that they can be with our systems.

Dan

On time and on budget.

Monika

Well exactly. With that said Guys, we're going to have to kind of wrap it up. We're out of time. Thanks for listening today with us. Team thanks for being on with us as well.

Robert

It is a pleasure.

Monika

You know if again for those of you out there, if you ever need anything, if you want to even ask advice we do give free consultations. We're here to give advice you know, we may not be a right fit today but that doesn't mean you can't ask us for advice on what to do today. So that way we can maybe work with you tomorrow. So always feel free to give us a call 404-369-0009 or visit us at www.hirearinger.com. And have a glorious weekend. Thanks everybody.

Robert

Here on Ringer Radio.

Read 688 times Last modified on Wednesday, 30 November 2016 16:36
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