Monday, 25 July 2016 09:42

Ringer Radio Episode 18

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Gabe
Hello. Welcome Atlanta this is Gabriel and Monica Meacham with Ringer Radio. I just got a note here from future Gabe. He said this was probably the best episode we have ever recorded.

Monika
Oh, wow...

Gabe
So, future Gabe I hope you are right. Otherwise you got egg on your face, you're just nomming . So with that Monica why don’t you go ahead and introduce who we got.

Monika
Yeah, we have Todd Peneguy. Is that correct?

Todd
That is correct.

Monika
Awesome. We got Tod here. He is the chair of a really big event that’s gonna be coming up here in July – I believe you said July 19th …

Todd
That is correct.

Monika
...with Tag which is, for those of you that may not know, Tag is probably the biggest technological association here in Georgia. And they’re doing a really big event in July called the “Internet of Things”.

Todd
That is correct.

Monika
Awesome

Gabe
Alright.

Monika
So, this is the first event of its type here. Is that correct?

Todd
That is also correct. And by the way, I guess future Gabe it’s on me to make sure this is the best show you’ve ever recorded. So no pressure.

Gabe
I’ll let future Gabe now that. So, before we get into that really. We’ve got a little bit of news update and what not. We’re talking about the challenges last week and we’re gonna go ahead and formalize this for the next… Every year we try to take 10% of our overall revenue and turn that into a charity site at the end of the year. So this year we want to go ahead and start early in June and make it a social event also to where people out there can vote on what charity is one most deserving or most needing of a new site. You know what we can give back. Us and the whole team. You know, we’ve done this for the last three years now and it has always worked out really really well but it was never really a big public thing. This time we’re gonna, you know, we’re gonna make it a big public thing where people can basically cast a vote. And we’re gonna do it a little bit different… Because I’m a little sick a demented.

Monika
Yea, he is.

Gabe
We’re gonna make it a… You publish a video with the hash-tag ringercharity2016. So #ringercharity2016 of you eating the grossest or weirdest or something just most entertainting item. And if you win our opinion poll… it’s gonna work, trust me, it’ll be fine, then basically you choose what charity we’re gonna…

Monika
I just wanna make sure there’s rules. Can we not have like anybody eating feces or alive animals or… I mean let’s not go crazy. Some people wanna be socially… you know that person that gets a hundred thousand likes so.

Gabe
I think if you couldn’t post it on Facebook and have your mama see it you ought not post it. So, let some general rules apply but in the video go ahead and say what charity and why and then go ahead and slush it down whatever it may be. So, I mean if it’s just a bad thing or koolaid or spolied milk, i mean whatever. I’m sure there’s some very interesting things out there that people would love to… now you go through one night of stomach pain for your favorite charity. How hard is that?

Monika
Let’s hope that’s all you go through.

Gabe
Well, I mean, you know, a hospital busy here and there but we don’t take any responsibility whatsoever for you and your foolishness. So, back with that we’re gonna get right into the internet of things… I just did the ultimate bad rule of smashing my hand on the table.

Monika
Yeah, no table-hitting.

Gabe
But, it’s alright. OK. That’s enough of my news announcements. Let’s move on.

Monika
Yeah, so again Todd… we have Todd here. So Todd tell us about the “Internet of Things”. What is this about? What’s going on?

Gabe
I’m a goober that has a phone. Tell me what you mean by first. What are we talking about when we talk about the “Internet of Things”?

Todd
That’s a good question. It means a lot of different things to different people. Suffice to say that it will impact every aspect of our lives. I’m talking from wearables which we all know about, it’s kinda sexy and cool but that’s more of a trend… you know, it is what it is. Then it’s impacting our port authority. How we transport goods and products across the country. It’s impacting music and television and the arts and sciences. It’s impacting financing, health-caring and farming and… we’ve got the internet of cows now. And it’s impacting how we grow peanuts in South Georgia.

Gabe
Wow. So every little thing. Is it basically just making ASAP better data or…?

Todd
It’s a lot bigger now. Let me start with… kinda how we got here. So, you mentioned the Technology Association of Georgia. For those of you out there in the audience that are unfamiliar with the organization, it’s the most biggest powerful technical association in the United States and some argue in the world with over 30 000 members, and there’s over 2 000 companies that are member organizations. And it’s broken up into what they call societies and there’s 34 of them. In each society represents a certain vertical in technology. Things like, you know, mobility and cloud and health care and financial technology and the list just goes on. I happen to sit on two boards, cloud mobility. Last summer we decided hey, we wanna do a signature event...each society. But we didn’t know what. Then you fast forward to November and each society independently said: “Hey, let’s do it on the “Internet of Things” ”. And based out of this conversation… you know say: “Hey, let’s just partner together”. And I’m thinking less work.

Gabe
Nah, no. Twice as big a party, twice as big a clean up, you know…

Todd
Exactly. But I knew something was different because the very first two people to raise their hand to volunteer to help out was Gerald Miller who’s the CTO for the Atlanta Falcons and then there’s David deBarry who’s the CEO for Airwatch and they’re now embarking on their third company called “Wondering WI-FI” and I’m thinking that’s kinda groovy man.

Gabe
Absolutely. When you get the support of the peers that are… people know what they’re doing is a good thing. Now, the event itself, how is it shaping up? What’s the format? Are we talking about speakers or an expo or do you have any idea...?

Todd
Absolutely. So, it’s a one day event. It’s gonna be in July 19th at the Renaissance Waverly located at the Cobb Galleria. It starts at 7 am with registration and in general just milling around. We’ll kick off with the keynote speaker. We’ve got a very exciting announcement, hopefully next we’re gonna put a pin in that for now. But it’s big. Huge. Beyond that we’ve got SAP one of our signature sponsors. They’re flying in global subject matter experts to talk about the “Internet of Things”. We’ve got Global Payments who isn’t a vendor however they signed on as our second representing sponsor and they’re flying in this crew from the Netherlands to talk about the infrastructure they deployed in a matter of weeks for a couple thousand dollars for the entire city of Amsterdam. They’re coming in and they were tying in a hackathon with that and it’s ultimately gonna lead up to a crescendo at the end of the lunch engagement. And beyond that we’ve got… you know, there are ServicNow who’s another sponsor, Hortonworks, Splunk and it’s a who’s who list in terms of speakers. More importantly though, the audience… it’s senior executives. We’re laser focused on positioning Georgia as being a global execution leader, regarding “Internet of Things” within the next three to five years.

Gabe
OK. So what does that mean? We’re kinda manufacturing, importing, splicing together of genes of Internet and things or...? What are you talking about mad scientists stuff for most of our audience.

Todd
Yeah. So, there’s … I had a chance to see a guy named Allen Loche speak. He’s the director of Georgia Tech Research Institute and after seeing him speak it literally changed the trajectory of my professional career. What I learned from him in his presentation is two key things. One is, we’re on the precipice of the fourth Industrial Revolution. Now most people have never heard of this or even what the first three were. So, let’s define this. The first Industrial Revolution was steam powered engines, in the 17th hundreds. The second one was electricity and the assembly line and that was the turn of last century. The third one was computers. That was in the forties. And now the computer Industrial Revolution we’ve had five waves of technical innovation. Mainframes then microprocessors, PC’s, desktop internet and then the mobile wave. Now we’re entering the sixth wave of technical innovation which is the “Internet of Things” which is so massive that it’s propelling us into this.. the fourth Industrial Revolution. Beyond that, the second thing I learned is that if get our heads above of the sand and look globally on who’s leading on this… it’s the Germans.

Monika
Oh yeah!

Todd
They coined the phrase: “The Fourth Industrial Revolution”. Their entire economy is revolving around this idea. The second thing is China. Late last year announced their big plan which is: “Made in China 2025” defined as: “We have to compete with the Germans, not the United States”.

Monika
Well, I didn’t even know that the Germans were that far up there when it came to that. I didnt know to be honest with you.

Todd
They’re so far in front of us! In fact you google… you know… Industry 4.0 the wiki-page is coined by the Germans in 2011 by the German Government. And they’re so far in front of us is ridiculous. And then the Chinese of course follow ensued and…

Gabe
So, what are the types of products that you would kinda see them using and… how are they introducing the “Internet of Things”?

Todd
They as in Germans?

Gabe
Yeah.

Todd
I read a great article on Forbes… an interview with the CEO of energy Siemens ….energy and automation. They’re talking about the idea of chasing mass customization down to zero. So, what they had the ability to do is looking through their entire supply chain. Not just what they have or their suppliers but their supplier suppliers and the ability to reach out to them and say: “Hey, we need you to custom print on your 3D printer this part that’s gonna go in our piece of equipment that we can customize for a client to no additional charge.”

Gabe
OK.

Monika
Cause it’s about customization.

Gabe
Yeah.

Monika
Wow.

Todd
One aspect of it.

Monika
Well, we’re gonna take a quick break real quick… and then get back into it, so we’ll be right back.

Monika
Welcome back Atlanta. Again we’re here with Gabe and Monica Meacham and we have Todd here with us. From the “Internet of Things”. The event that’s comping up here in July… again it’s July 19th . For those that wanna that information about how to buy tickets for it, how does that work?

Todd
She can go to iotga.com or the twitter hash-tag is #iot_ga.

Monika
OK. Great. Cool. So how did you get involved with this? What brought you to say: “You know what? I wanna run this event and see what… how it goes?”

Todd
That’s a good question. So, about a year ago, I was with a pretty cool start-up company out of California but… there’s something I’m very passionate about is the fact that Georgia has the single most powerful technical ecosystem in the world. And I’ll define that. When you look at TAG in and of itself is impressive, but there’s these other professional organizations that complement and surround TAG. I’m talking about the Georgia CIO Leadership Association, Atlanta Telecom Professionals and Tech Bridge and you have the Universe assessment of Georgia, 33 Fortune 1000 companies here. And the cadence with which our senior executives get together to solve problems, talk about potential solutions or just give back to our community, there’s nothing like this in the world. I’ve presented this to executives from all over the place. And it’s really cool. Right? But as I’m looking at this… I wanted to work for a company that’s headquartered in Atlanta Georgia, to really dive into this community. And I… so I made a mistake. I signed on with a company and quickly realized, after about a week, that I’ve made a big mistake. So rather than faking it. At the end of last year as this thing is bubbling up and I’m seeing the order of magnitude, that this is truly a global movement. The Greeks had two words for time. There’s Chronos which is the passage of time and there’s a lesser known word which is Kiros which means the perfect or opportune moment in time. And I’m seeing this just as an incredible moment in time for us to leap forward and to leverage this ecosystem that we have here. So had a spirited conversation with my wife and I’m like: “Honey, I’m gonna quit my job and do this full-time.” And she’s got my back. She owns a sign company called “Image 360” in Alpharetta Georgia. And so she makes enough to cover the bases. And it give me the opportunity… like I said earlier, less work for me. Well, actually I spent over 80 hours a week working on this thing. Promoting it.

Monika
This is all volunteer work. This is not paying anything…

Todd
100% volunteer and I’m loving every single minute of it. Because I get to meet really cool people and geek out all the time.

Monika
Right.

Todd
Which brings you a question. What kind of things or solutions are out on the place? There are so many stories your head would swim. For example: farming. How do you describe farming? Right? So, there is a company I met with yesterday, it’s called “The Agricdata” and they’re building sensors on these devices where… they’ll put it in the middle of farms and it’s testing the pH balance, the soil consistency and moisture within the ground which helps optimize yield production. And then they’re talking about putting these on the tilts on the back of tractors as they’re farming the land they’ll knew the exact soil composition, and if you think globally, we have to have a 70% increase in total global yield just to feed the world by 2015. So you have to come up with new ways to approach these things. Another one is pacemakers. There’s a company called “Cardioe Mems” down here in Atlanta Georgia where they’re taking IOT devices and putting it on your heart … it’ll kick-start your heart. I think there’s a song in there somewhere. Right?

Gabe
Sure. So, it basically tracks and sends the information somewhere and it’s being … monitored or algorithszmically (algorithmically) monitored?

Todd
This is exactly it. Kimberly Clark for example…I mean…toilet paper. It doesn’t get any less sexier than that. But they’re taking sensors and they’re putting on rolls of toilet paper and then shipping that out to their clients and it’s able to: (a) detect when the rolls about to go out, so you don’t have a bad customer survey experience and then it also communicates to Kimberly Clark when they’re about to run out so they can proactively ship more product to … Isn’t that great?

Monika
Yeah. Great inventory management. Yeah, yeah.

Todd
You have Coca Cola with the freestyle machines. Then I have a good friend of mine Jose Heavy who’s the founder of a company called “Draftserv”. Think of freestyle cokes for beer. Right?

Gabe
Yeah, makes sense. Absolutely.

Monika
I mean overall it’s a….

Gabe
Well, we see... I’m really into drones and stuff like that so we’ve seen that … four years the shrinkage of the chip going from your thumb to the smallest part of your thumb now.

Monika
Right. Gee! Just look at the phones. Look at our phones. How much they’ve changed. I mean, our tablets, our laptops our everything.

Gabe
Yeah. And like … even the Mac-books that have so much area and display area and the actual processing power is now in like a small corner of it. So, it’s just… it’s really cool the ability to basically to have a computer in or attached to every little thing.

Monika
Everything, yeah. And I mean, what you can get from it and collecting the data… I mean for what you were saying about the tractors and the toilet paper … that type of data… I’m data junkie personally, I love data ‘cause there’s so much you can do with it. If you have all different components and data points, you can virtually do almost anything to reduce your cost … any excess cost that you have, out of making business… I mean there’s so much you can do with the right data points and ….so.

Todd
That’s exactly it. Right now it’s all about one of my favorite words: perspective. Right? In the past you had maybe one data point and then as you fast-forward you have two. Right? Now you have the ability not just to have lots of data points within your organization but the ability to mesh that up with thousands of other data points from all kinds of other systems, you get a unique perspective. For example weather. Right? Few people realize this but weather impacts about ½ of the global domestic product, the global economy, every single day. And people utilize this information built to mesh that up with their own internal systems is ridiculous. What you’re able to glean from that just to get a new perspective.

Gabe
Interesting.

Monika
Wow.

Gabe
So, are we looking at a whole new level of … does AI play into this or are we talking about that part of things as-well as having artificial intelligence built into different things we use...?

Todd
Eventually. We’re not quite there yet. It’s interesting, I read a book a while back on intelligence, it talks about the energy it would take to power the computer equivalent of the human brain. It’s like the power of the city of Atlanta to produce complexities of our ability to process. However, there’s something, another thing that really just kind galvanizing and changed the course of my career is I read an obscure article, a white paper written by Henry Adams. Now, nobody has ever heard of this guy. He’s an American historian and his grandfather and great-grandfather was John Adams and John Quincy Adams, couple of US presidents. And he wrote a paper 1909 entitled “The Rule of Phase Applied to Humanity”. Now phase-shifting physics is the change from the solid to a liquid to a gas, right? But there’s some phase-shifts in humanity. In 1909 he basically articulated Moor’s law, which is the law of exponential growth where the computer chip doubles in process power every year and a half. He talked about this before computer chips were invented. In 1909, right? But something he said is that the law of acceleration is just like any law in physics and that it cannot relax its energy to support convenience of mankind. In other words we can’t stop this. And based on everything I’m seeing and reading and hearing, and we’ve had global economic meltdowns, a couple of global wars and all kind of terrorist activities, yet we’re still putting people on the moon. We’re still marching forward. And at this rate of progression … you know… we’re only bound by imagination on what we can do as we move forward.

Gabe
Right. Do you… well I guess we got a couple of minutes before we go to break so, you have any predictions… I’ll ask you one. How long until the cars on the road, we can finally just sit back and say: “You know what Atlanta traffic, fine, do your thing. I’m not paying attention” - and fold my arms and go to sleep?

Todd
Well, interestingly enough, in your very building, on the second floor, there’s a company called “Park Mobile”.

Monika
In this building?

Todd
In this building.

Monika
Oh!

Todd
Directly below you on the second floor. Jon Ziegler and I met yesterday. He is the CEO of the company and they’re experts in parking applications. So you download their app and their app will take you to a physical parking-spot, you pay for that spot right then and there, and then if you are over the time it’ll send you a notifications saying: “Hey dude, you’re about to expire. Say, you’re gonna pay for some more time or come and get your car.” It’s brilliant. Well, they’re gonna make a huge announcement tomorrow, unfortunately I can’t make it at a time, but they’re about to make a huge announcement with a company in Seattle. They talked about …

Monika
Well, remember we’re prerecorded so we’re actually … you can announce and if they’re announcing tomorrow we’re not airing ‘till after that.

Gabe
As you well may know by now.

Todd
OK. I can’t remember the exact company name but they’re headquartered in Seattle Washington. It’s one of the biggest companies you’ve never heard of but allows the park-mobile application which is the framework and infrastructure to communicate with all these other parking applications and rather than downloading an app, your car will actually communicate with your parking, pay for it and take you to your destination. The more to your point, the self-driving cars…

Gabe
Tesla is almost there.

Todd
Almost there.

Monika
We got a couple of them with the stopping, parking they can do the parking they can do stopping.

Gabe
They’re flirting with …. the model 3. They’re flirting with going ahead and calling it a self-driving car but I don’t think they can.

Todd
They’re already there. They’ve actually proven that it works out in California. Now, when will it become … you know main… I’d say ten years. It’s in the foreseeable future.

Gabe
As soon as actually ...everybody starts believing I suppose...what you do about the… I think the problem is, right now, is connection between cars. As soon you have car to hard-car communication and they can talk to each other and say: “Hey, you’re about to hit me. Stop it!”. Or we look out on the road there and every car is communicating with each other and saying: “Hey, I’m going here, I’m going here, I’m going here, I’m going here… stay out of my way”. But my point is that’s really the critical step is that car-to-car communication. Otherwise it only takes one bad rogue out there to kinda spoil the whole part of the…

Monika
But you’ll never get there because there’s always gonna be rogues out there, just as always there’s gonna be your old cars.

Todd
Now, will the cars be cursing each other out?

Monika
You’ll never get out of your classic car.

Gabe
But, I mean, will they even solve that with… I mean there’s so many sensors on new cars coming out that they can, in real time, map out the 3D world within 45-50 feet of the car and navigate even the rogue cars. But, I mean, before it’s mass-adopted it has to be towards apple-simple and you just jump in the car and maybe that’s the Apple-Car, who knows? But, you know, you jump in the car and don’t think about things and I can guarantee when Apple puts out, everyone of their cars are gonna talk to each other.

Todd
That’s exactly right. Here’s a great use case. There’s this coming car... kind of car called… Snider Eectrics that are putting sensors on cars and how you’ve got your GPS say: “Hey, right turn in 500 feet”. This one will say: “Hey, black guys in 500 feet”. And the reason is the cars are communicating to each others up and the cloud and based on … you know… you’ve got several cars in front of you that the positraction or whatever is called starts to skid on the black guys and it’s communicating and you’re on that same road so it prevents you. Now think of monetizing that. Who would wanna have access to that information. We’re talking about the Department of Transportation so they can fix it faster, insurance companies would sure like to have that, moms and dads would love to have that and I’m sure there’s a lot of people that would love to have access to that information. But then you segway into the problem of… you know the creep factors...having… the government having too much of your information.

Gabe
Well, I mean, it’s already there. And with that: government having too much information we’re going to go to commercial and we’ll be right back.

Gabe
Hello and welcome back to Ringer Radio. This is Gabriel and Monica Meacham. We’re here with Todd, talking about the “Internet of Things” and what’s going on at this TAG event coming up…

Monika
Again, that event is July 19th … where’s that gonna be at?

Todd
Reneisance Waverly at the Cobb Galleria.

Monika
And, how can somebody, again, if they wanna find that information for it.

Todd
iotga.com or the twitter is #iot_ga

Monika
OK. Awesome.

Gabe
Alright. Let’s go kinda where we left off. I believe we were just talking about possibilities, we were just talking about the broad ways, and that’s kinda my biggest thing is… it takes a while for people to adopt to the new technologies but once that adoption phase is over it becomes second nature. And that’s …

Monika
It’s just the change part. People don’t like change. But once they go through the change they don’t wanna change again so…

Gabe
Exactly. It’s like why didn’t I know a car coming with a thousand sensors? You know? I don’t know we were neanderthals. I think it’s interesting to tell our kids about the days before there was a chip in every single toy you owned.

Monika
Well, I have a question. Do you think that the flying cars really gonna actually happen?

Gabe
It’s already up there. You can buy a flying car right now.

Monika
But, it’s not adopted as a standard…

Gabe
It’s not adopted and it’s expensive that’s crazy and he’s only built like two of them, but if you wanna a couple of jet-engines and strap them to ya basically…

Todd
Have you seen those jet-packs? These guys over in Europe flying around with jet-packs.

Monika
Really?!

Todd
Yeah.

Monika
It sounds like Europe’s way ahead of us from what you’ve been… from a couple of days…

Todd
Way, yes.

Monika
Really? Wow!

Gabe
Yeah… they’re bordered over there. You know.

Monika
...they’re more… no there’s got less regulations maybe or less things to… hurdles to go past. I don’t know.

Gabe
I don’t know. I really think it’s … they’re an older culture. More forward looking. We’re very reactive in our culture. So anyway, that’s another subject. Todd sorry. OK. So, tell me, what kind of people do we expect to see at this event…?

Todd
Yeah, no. This isn’t exactly a panacea, it’s an event. But it’s an event where we lay a foundation on which to grow. So, in order to get in position. Georgia has been a global executioner… notice my seen thought leader… thought leaders is rounds of write, write academia and you just sit around and pontificate things. This is about getting things done, right? So, to become execution leader, we have to galvanize a core group of our communities leaders. Remember that powerful ecosystem that I was talking about earlier. We’re limited to 500 seats, right? And we wanna pack… reverse the creative principle have 80% of the audience come from our senior executives in the communities. The chief executives down to their direct report of all size companies and all industries, right? So, we’re gonna have a fantastic representation from the agriculture community and then the carpet mills and the manufacturing and everything else in between, right? And then the other 20% will be the vendors who are stepping up and bringing in some global talent to speak at the event.

Gabe
OK. Now, what are some of the factors I guess that… Georgia… I’m gonna just ask the question specifically: why Georgia and maybe not Silicon Valley?

Todd
So, there’s … it’s kind of a known thing in the tech world. Silicon Valley looks down at the South….

Gabe
...on the rest of the world.

Todd
... on the rest of the world, right? We’re just a bunch of guitar banjo picking…

Gabe
Sure, yeah.

Todd
There’s a great article recently came out that I love. It’s entitled: “We’re fixing innovate”. And it’s all about the South and about these circles of influence within Georgia and Alabama and Tennessee and the Carolinas and Florida that says alright: “You think we’re these hillbillies? Watch us?”.

Gabe
We might talk a little slower but… you know.

Todd
It’s exactly right. But more importantly, again I keep coming at the fact that this ecosystem in Georgia is ridiculous. The connectedness and it’s a southern culture that I think would crush Silicon Valley if we can truly rise to this occasion. And it’s something I just passionately believe. But in Georgia itself, why Georgia, right? We have an unemployment rate of less than 1% in the tech sector, right? And that’s of Herculaneum efforts…

Monika
That’s amazing.

Todd
It absolutely is, right. But that’s because you can’t fill the jobs. We have hundreds of companies that are outsourcing Georgia jobs to other countries because you don’t have the talent to fill them. Or we’re raiding other countries for incredible talent to come here. I think that’s great. However, this gap is gonna only increase as we move forward into the 21st century. We have to galvanize our state leaders from the educational standpoint and so far we got people like Boby Lorane CIO for the Board of Regions, University Systems of Georgia. Serena Sacks and Angela Bacon from Foldning Cobb County School Systems, we have the CIO’s and CTO’s from Georgia State and Emery and Georgia Tech and Kennesaw State University jumping on board. But more importantly it’s getting the educational system in alignment to produce the talent to fill the jobs we have today but the Germans what they’re doing is they’re taking people and make career, people like us and they’re re-purposing them, retooling them to take over these jobs. You’re not losing that intellectual business knowledge. You’re taking that leveraging it but teaching them how to take over these positions.

Gabe
And I imagine if they come from AG they go back to AG.

Todd
Boom.

Gabe
You know, if they come from transportation. They retrain them, re-purpose them, they go back to transportation.

Todd
Exactly.

Monika
So,I wanna go back a second ‘cause you said that, you know, that we’re 1% unemployment rate here. Do you think part of that has anything to do with, you know, what was it, 8 years ago, 7 years ago, when … probably big economic time but there is a lot of jobs that are being outsourced at that time. There’s a lot of people that were in the information technology field or doing different things in terms of that but their jobs got outsourced. Do you think there’s a correlation there on why there’s not as many people that are in it now?

Todd
Yes. I totally agree with you but it’s a little bit more than that, right? To paraphrase Justin Timberlake: “We’re gonna bring sexy back” - to education. The kids in high school they’re not engaged in this sort of thing. They’re going and actually, quite frankly, they’re penalized. To go into a Georgia based University coming from Georgia you’re on the HOPE scholarship. And everybody knows that the STEM programs are a little bit harder. So, why would a student go in a really hard program and they risk the chance of falling below the 3.0 GPA. Well the tech community just this year put a bill in front of Governor Dale and he signed it into law stating OK we’ll weigh this a little bit differently. Not that we’re try to bring dumb kids in. No, we’re trying to get those late bloomers into the STEM programs that are needed to foster the creativity knowledge and to build these jobs right here in our back-yard.

Monika
So, we are trying to bring the jobs back. It’s just it’s taking time because there’s not as many people available.

Gabe
And a couple of weeks ago we were meeting with a buddy from the Georgia Manufacturing Alliance. He was saying on of the big benefits that we have here in Georgia is the opening of new ports in Savannah and that’s gonna have a huge economic impact as us being one of the major importers. And then everything else trickles down from there but I wonder how all these things are played together.

Monika
They are played together so yeah. I mean even though manufacturing is hard goods it still relies on data and it still leveraging the online world and tools and everything like that…

Gabe
The next version of everything you buy is gonna be that plus a chip. And then you’re gonna wonder what are all these things a chip can do? You know? But, yeah… everything’s gonna be a smart-something… you’re not gonna be able to buy a refrigerator without it being a smart refrigerator…

Monika
You got smart TV’s. You got smart fridges. You got smart-everything.

Todd
My refrigerator called me the other day and says: “Hey dude, we’re out of milk”.

Monika
Sooner or later, you never know.

Gabe
And then I had a cloud service that when I hadn’t called the Kroger on behalf of the milk and they’ve imported the milk…

Monika
There’s always a direct link between Amazon and your fridge. I mean that could happen eventually if you have certain cubby-holes that put specific things and when it goes empty it automatically sends a request and purchases it because you always have.

Todd
No, we literally can do that now. It’s just the user adoption. So, you tell me how self-driving cars … well they are now but people actually let go of the control… a great example is in the farming community. Something I learned yesterday is they have self-driving tractors. They’ve been around for well over a decade and they’ve proven in numerous studies that they are a lot more efficient than people picking crops or a person actually driving a tractor. They just work. The problem is, farmers are very slow to adopt technology and to let go. I mean I’d put myself in overalls in a tractor like man I don’t wanna give up my tractor. That’s fun. That’s my… you know, who I am what I’m about but it slowly starting to happen.

Monika
And I think some people are scared though too of adopting. They think it’s more… they think it’s gonna be more difficult to adopt than it will be…

Gabe
Why does everybody have like a matrix mentality? Is: “Oh no! We’re gonna fall into the matrix”. You know if all of the crops are sprayed or monitored by drones flying around and stuff like that … oh no… that’s way too… what would the farmer ever do? Except for now the farmer can produce ten times more yield. The farmer becomes rich, you know. And that’s what the farmer does.

Todd
Yeah, god bless you man.

Gabe
Alright. With that we’re gonna go on a break and listen to the commercial. Buy some other stuff and we’ll be right back.

Monika
Welcome at Ringer Radio. Again we’re here with Gabe and I’m Monica. He’s Gabe and we have Todd here with us. We’ve been talking about the “Internet of Things”, it’s an event coming on July 19th. It’s the flagship event, the first one … the first one of its time basically. And it’s gonna be held a yearly event that they’re planning on doing every year and pretty big event from what I understand, right Todd? So how many people do are we expecting?

Todd
So year one… there’s this great book called: “The Two Second Advantage”. And it’s all about predictive analytics and... but the opening metaphor is wrapped around Wayne Gretzky, right? So let’s hop by it’s liabilities. He wasn’t the biggest guy, he wasn’t the fastest guy he wasn’t the strongest guy in the ice – you know he’s not gonna go out there and like fight people. But in spite his liabilities he said I’m gonna be the smartest guy. And rather than skating where the puck is, he started going to where the puck was going, you know, like two seconds from now. And then when he got the puck he started thinking: “OK, rather than passing towards my guys are I’m gonna pass where they should be in two seconds”. And he became one of the greatest hockey players ever in terms of goal scored and assists. So with year one our liabilities are, you know, the venue. It’s a fantastic venue but we’re limited to 500 people. And if we actually tried we could easily pack this thing with well over a thousand or two thousand people. So understand that we call last, you know on the message what it is and then the attendees. So the message is shoring up education K-20 plus re-purposing people to make career. The other one is infrastructure, right? What… How do we build up the infrastructure across Georgia that’s needed to allow us to truly emerge as an execution leader on the “Internet of Things”. Twenty years ago, most people don’t know this, the city of Alpharetta before building up the city, laid this fiber-optic cable underground and then built the city on top of it. Because of that, it’s the reason why so many high-tech companies have moved to Alpharetta Georgia which was farmland, you know 20-25 years ago. So how do we take that thinking and apply it here. Secondly, the audience. It’s gonna big not in numbers. It’s gonna big in terms of caliber of people that we have involved.

Monika
Type of attendees.

Todd
That’s exactly right. We’re talking CIO’s and CTO’s and SVP’s from First Data and Global Payment and Coca Cola, Errands Incorporated and the American Cancer Society and the School Systems and Southern Company and the list just goes on and on. So towards that end, again, about 400 people, all senior executives and quite frankly we want people who were unable to attend or failed to realize just how big this is to get really pissed off that they did not have a chance to attend to this event.

Monika
Wow. So are you gonna have … it’s basically open for anybody...essentially it’s open for anybody but you’re attracting the sea-level executives…

Todd
It’s exactly right. And not just IT. But, you know, the CMO’s, COO’s, CEO’s, this is truly a boardroom type of conversation.

Monika
So are you gonna have vendors as well there or is it just gonna be speakers… is it gonna be… what type of engagement is gonna be happening during the event?

Todd
Oh, absolutely. There’s gonna be SAP and Global Payments and... Splunk, I think the guys from downstairs with… Parkmobile are gonna sponsor, we talking to Intel, and they are looking to become a pretty big sponsor. Yeah there is a huge engagement and, again, world class presenters coming in. And for those entrepreneurs that are out there think about this for a moment; There’s a Marketo story or analysis that said the IOT industry was a 2 billion dollar industry in 2013. Recently Cisqo came out with this study saying that this is gonna be a 14.4 trillion dollar global industry in less than six years. This is year 2022. Now think about this, Georgia had VC funding to the tune of last year of 495 million dollars. Sounds like a big number and then we increase that by like 80% to 850 million just like last year, quite frankly, that’s embarrassing. It represents barely over 1% of total DC funding in the United States. Assuming we get this right, we get this core group of – my word – butt-kickers, the kind of people who just make things happen then we can truly step forward, leap-frog against some of the areas of the country that are starting to lead on this, have more VC funding pour into Georgia and this benefits every single aspect of our state’s economy.

Monika
So how would somebody, again, remind us again … the website address.

Todd
So, it’s iotga.com or #iot_ga for twitter or reach out to me via LinkedIn, again, I’m spending about 80 hours a week as a chief of Angeles for this event and I would love to talk to anybody that wants to get involved and help to propel Georgia as being a leader.

Monika
Awesome. Are tickets already on sale or not yet? When do they go on sale?

Todd
Right now you can buy a table at a time and they are on sale and you go, again, that’s iotga.com or you can go to the TAG website that’s tagonline.org.

Gabe
So, let’s take a minute. We got two minutes right on. So the event’s gonna be awesome and … also let’s catch people up that don’t know what TAG’s about, do you have kind of a good poster picture for TAG?

Todd
Yea, so five years ago I joined TAG and quite frankly it’s the smartest decision that I’ve made in my career. And the reason is I’ve gotten out of technology and to quote Monty Python: “Nobody would even spit in my general direction”. It was humbling and I’d heard about this thing called TAG and I wrongly assumed this place were… you know… people trying to sell you stuff or you trying to get a job. That does go on but the brilliance of TAG is all about education. In the 34 societies they have, I started to go on every single thing that I could fit my personal schedule and I felt like one of those little prairie dog. They come out of the ground you looking around and you pop back down and after four months it’ll pop up and like wow, this is different something has changed here. And the people that you meet and the things that you learn… I found that after a couple of months to this the language I had I could talk to anybody at any level of the organization, about virtually anything in the technology world. So, for example MDM… well we’re talking about mobile device management which is their watches world or really talking about master data management which is the Golden Record. And if we’re talking about that we’re really talking about the Golden Record or Data Governance which is roles associated with data within an organization. I could geek out for hours on end. I mean it’s such a beautiful place and you never know who you’re sitting next to. You can be sitting next to a headhunter or CIO of a four billion dollar company.

Monika
I’ve been to several tech events. They’re really good events and … they got a wide spread on who they cater to… I mean you have anywhere from going to young entrepreneurs to young professionals to all these subgroups they have… It’s a really good organization overall so if you are in the field… you know you should … the technological field I guess, you should check it out and you know...so yeah. So, Todd thank you, again, for coming on with us today. We really appreciate it…

Todd
Thank you.

Monika
Yeah, we had a great time. We hope that everyone gets to come and check out your … or those that can, come check out the event. July 19th again.

Gabe
You have to check in with us once this is done.

Todd
I’d be honored to.

Monika
Again, everyone thank you for listening to us. If you have any questions for me or Gabe or any issues you need help with, again we do website development and custom software, you can reach us at 404-369-0009 or go to our website at www.hirearinger.com. Have a wonderful weekend.

Gabe
Thanks guys. Bye.

Read 458 times Last modified on Wednesday, 21 September 2016 08:56

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