Monday, 25 July 2016 09:41

Ringer Radio Episode 16

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Monika
Good Afternoon, Atlanta. Happy Friday the 13th.

Gabe
It’s kind of spooky being on the radio on Friday the 13th.

Monika
It’s not really Friday today.

Gabe
I know but Future Gabe is currently scared about what happened on Friday the 13th.

Monika
Why? It’s actually a good day.

Gabe
Anyway, welcome to the show. This is Ringer Radio on NewsTalk 1160 and we are blessed and fortunate to have an amazing guest with us to sit and talk with us about all things networking and all things entrepreneur. Monika, give us a nice intro.

Monika
Actually I’ve been to many of his events. He is the founder of The Big Event. It’s a little bit of a different networking forum for business owners and entrepreneurs. It’s more of a social atmosphere. It’s not so sit-down-in-a-chair-one-person-at-a-time-talk-everyone-give-your-30-second-pitch-and-walk-away. This is more of get to know the people you’re with and build a relationship…

Gabe
Why don’t you let the man talk?

Monika
With further ado, Joel Peskin with The Big Event.

Joel
Thank you for having me here today.

Gabe
So Joel, how long have you been working the networking circuit? My first question for you is what made you start doing it?

Joel
That’s a really good question. I think it was about in 2007, I actually joined the John’s Creek Chamber of Commerce. I used to go to networking events. My prior life, I was a trader on Wall Street and before that I was in the music business. So when I was on Wall Street I had no clients. I was doing my own thing and I was not good in speaking at all. So it was a speed networking event…my first event…I’m going “I don’t know what to say.” I was just frightened. I was shaking. I was sweating. Kind of got through that day, joined the Chamber and then I had to do 30-second speeches and still frightened and like “how do I not do this anymore?”

Monika
It’s more spotlight right?

Joel
Right but I kind of got through it and I went over to the Gwinnet Chamber for a while, went to the Cobb Chamber a while and North Fulton Chamber and because I was in the music business and it was kind of social to me I just seemed to gravitate the non-suits, more of the fun people. I wasn’t a suit so if you’re stiff I need someone a little more fun. About 2 or 3 years later I decided to throw out an email to about 300 people I had cards with and send them an email. Fifty or 60 different networking events, all my friends, it’s on one list. And it kind of grew and grew to about 800 or so and then one day I decided to do my own event. It had no name to it. It was the last Monday. It was April [maybe March] of 2011. It rained the very first time and 4 people showed up. I go “maybe just cancel this one.” In April we had about 8 people. In May we had about 18 people. Then in June we had about 28 people and a lady came over and whispered in my ear “bring it over to my restaurant. I’ll give everybody free food.” I said “that sounds good” because we were just showing up and buying food and drinks. So I put out an email to about 1,000 and 170 people showed up. It was this really high-end restaurant in John’s Creek and people knew it so they we lined up. It was almost like Studio 54.

Monika
Plus they probably saw the email month over month and were like “this guy’s persistent and he’s doing something so there must be something to go to and check out.”

Gabe
The first time I went to an event you had well over 200 people.

Monika
Yeah, your first event was at the Double Tree.

Joel
Yeah, that was a good one. After the even was over the lady said “you want to do it again next month?” We did it again and after that was over I said “I think I have something here, they like what it is. I think I can monetize it.” Because I wasn’t a Chamber or a big corporation, I just did it the way you should do it. Then we started going to a lot of restaurants in the Alpharetta/John’s Creek area. They heard about it, they agreed to it…

Monika
…great advertising and marketing for them.

Joel
Yeah. How could you get new people in there without spending money? What does it cost you to bring in a new customer or let a new person see your venue? We’ve done Regis, we’ve done banks, of course more towards restaurants. We’ve done a lot of fun facilities also…new facilities in the area. It’s just been really wonderful. It got bigger and bigger and bigger. Actually when I started the event I didn’t have any name. I stopped doing it for about 3 months and I retitled it back in April of 2012. I just came up with a name The Big Event. It just seemed appropriate. It’s an event, it’s big, people are coming from all over and it’s just pretty much amazing. We’ve done over 50-60 events over the last few years and we’ve really helped a lot of venues get on the map, have the business professionals come there. They book weddings, they book Bar Mitvahs, graduations, all kinds of things to get the people in the venue.

Gabe
That kind of blends into one of the questions we had…you have your regular business as well and we were wondering, does someone start the networking business in hopes to bolster this other business? It’s gotten so big, did that take on a life of its own?

Joel
It was my secondary but it’s so much more fun than my primary that now this is my primary [the networking]. It just takes a lot of time and a lot of talking to people. I have about 800 vendors in my database. We hit just about 7,000 members in the newsletter called Joel’s List.

Monika
That’s a very good newsletter that you put out on Sundays. I use it quite a bit. I get it in and I will peruse it to know what to do for the week.

Gabe
At one point I started making a calendar of all the news events and then I came across your list and I was like “what’s the point? He’s already done all the work for me.”

Joel
I’ve done all the manual labor. The newsletter, called Joel’s List is truly email based. Even though I have a website, the website is more for lead capture, for new people to go to it, but we don’t keep it current. It’s a lead capture page so you could get that email and we could see what you’re looking at. We wanted to make the events bigger. I don’t have all the statistics on the website. It’s just a lead capture page that’s more email based. Everyday I get anywhere from 5-10 new people joining everyday. It’s a free newsletter. People say “how do you make money if it’s a free newsletter?” The whole idea is The Big Event. There’s no monthly membership fees. We just ask that if you use it regularly to help build and grow your business, the best place to help consolidate/seal the deal would be coming to The Big Event. I have my theories about networking events…what works for some people don’t work for other people…

Monika
We struggled with that quite a bit, in terms of the networking.

Joel
People always ask me “what’s the best event?” I go “besides mine?” In the newsletter I have a thing called Joel’s Weekly Picks and those are always well attended, well organized big events for that week. You’ll never go wrong. If you’re a newbie to networking just go down to the bottom of the page and you won’t go wrong.

Monika
So if they’re not on the Joel’s List right now, where can they go to register for the email?

Joel
Just go to www.joelslist.com [fill in the info].

Monika
You’ll start getting that newsletter. As I said, I use it all the time. I look at it every week.

Gabe
It’s amazing how many things are on the list. On any particular day there’s no chance that you could go to everything. There’s 10 things a day, easy, on this list and you just kind of have to pick and choose…

Monika
Unless you don’t have any work to get done.

Gabe
Even then…I think it’s physically impossible to be in all those places.

Joel
We list all the Chambers within a 40 mile radius, all the business associations. We list also a lot of great Meetups/Independent Networking events that are open. In the beginning we listed those events but what happened is I advertised a closed networking group and a guy came and his seat was taken. Luckily he was only 4 miles from the place but what happens if someone from Snellville drives up to Woodstock for this event?

Gabe
I never really liked that idea of closed events.

Joel
So we really list all open networking events. The closed networking events don’t need my help. They have their own internal mechanisms for building, growing and all the people within that group are always really looking for other people. So that’s one thing we just stay away from…we make no bones about it. We also stay away from listing non-profits. There’s so many of them you could have a whole newsletter on non-profits. We’re not going to list a non-profit/charity event. It’s not a networking event. You’re looking to raise money.

Monika
It doesn’t really help a lot of business owners, unfortunately.

Joel
I can’t do everything.

Monika
We gotta take a quick break. Ringer Radio.

Monika
Welcome back to Ringer Radio. Again, you have Gabriel and Monika Meacham here with you and we have Joel Peskin with The Big Event with us. We’ve been talking about networking and what he does in terms of his networking event and getting your business out there and how to meet people. That’s the first thing that people do, it’s one of the easiest and cheaper ways…more cost efficient I guess is a better way to put it…way of finding perspective clients and/or competitors and/or other businesses, is through networking.

Gabe
Good, solid connections with people and seeing where those relationships take you. Alright so Joel, what are the different types of networking…if somebody was new to the networking scene and they’re just like “I’m a guppy. I know nothing.” Let’s go ahead and help them out by classifying…cuz there are some definite different classifications that people need to know about.

Joel
There’s your morning event, there’s your midday (11:30-1) event and then there’s your after hours event. There’s 2 kinds of morning events…there’s 1 that most of the Chambers run. You’ll come in around 7:30, which is quite early because you’ve got to get up at 5 to start driving there, you network for about a half hour and then they usually have a speaker. Especially if it’s a breakfast thing, you only get to network with the people at the table you’re at. So if there’s 100 people there, you get to really see 12. You may make some great connections there. They’re usually higher level people at those meetings so you could get lucky a lot but it’s not really just a networking event.

Gabe
On that one, you’ve got to be 30 minutes early to get to meet anybody.

Joel
That’s right. So if it starts at 7:30, you get there at 7:15, you get about 30 minutes of just walking around the place before everybody sits down and then you talk at the table and they call to order…that’s usually over at 9. Then there’s the 11:30, lunch thing. It’s kind of the same thing with the Chambers and business associations…you get there at 11:30, 11:15, you network then you sit down, there’s a speaker… The best thing for me, within my business, is really the after hour events. They go from about 5:30 – 7:30 or 8 and to me that is really the new golf course of doing business. First of all, it’s air conditioned so you don’t have to sweat like on the golf course and plus there’s hundreds of people there…not just 4 people playing golf. I’ve met so many great people doing that because there’s alcohol, there’s soft drinks, there’s all kinds of things. No one has to run back to the office when the day is done so you’re there for the duration. Usually people stay the longest there and it’s just so much fun. It’s fun to meet people in a fun atmosphere…not in a stiff…

Monika
…it’s a great way to unwind for the day. You’ve been working, you don’t have to cut out part of your work day. The thing that I’ve always hated about the mid-afternoon lunches is that first of all, you have to drive to wherever you’re going which, depending where it is, could take 30 minutes to drive, then you’re sitting there for an hour and a half or so and then another 30 minutes. So you’re spending 2 ½ - 3 hours a day just for this one event when you have work to do. For us, our main time for working is right in the middle of the day so it kills our day because we’re trying to go network and trying to make business but then when are we supposed to work? So I like the after-hours because the day is done. I can go and have a drink and meet some new people. % the same people all the time and that’s great. You make friendships, you make relationships and things happen but you’re limiting yourself. What I’ve done over almost 5 years is I’ve gotten into about 60 of those fishbowls, whether it’s Gwinnet, Fulton, Dekalb, Cobb, the Buckhead area…I belong to and have gone to a lot of those events and cultivated great relationships and now when you come to The Big Event, it’s not the same old. The go to a Chamber it’s basically the same. Nothing’s wrong with that it’s just the same old. I could take 60 fishbowls and put them into one huge ocean and you get to see everybody and see we have a good database and a good core audience of about 200 people an then there’s all the new people or the people who can’t make it and there’s always new people going in and out, but there’s the great core also. They’re always loyal to the event and then they tell other people about it. There’s always new entrepreneurs trying to get out and find out where the events are. It’s been growing but we find that things actually happen during this event. A lot of connections…a lot of business taking place.

Gabe
We met Nick Black at that first event and we’ve done some things with him.

Monika
He’s been on the radio show with us and we kind of work with him pretty well…

Gabe
In terms of overall networking…no matter what you’re…we tell young entrepreneurs this all the time…you’re going to have to build a rapport. If you’ve got the kind of personality that people instantly fall in love with and they want to do business with you right away, you’re probably a salesperson anyhow and I’m not talking to you. Most likely I’m talking to the guy that you have to be talked in to going to an event like this. So if I’m talking to that guy realize still, it’s fun, it’s enjoyable but you’re going to end up having to build a rapport, you’re going to have to go to multiple events, you’re not going to suddenly get rich by going to 1 event and you’re all booked up. It takes a while to get to know people but…

Monika
…it’s building relationships. If somebody’s going to hand you business, especially in the industry we’re in, a lot of our jobs cost $10, $20, $30,000 in terms of a project and that’s a high price tag for somebody to have trust in you. So going to these events and them seeing you over and over again, even if they were to help connect you to the right person, that trust has been built.

Gabe
What do you got to say? From your perspective, is it just more about “I hold the event, you guys just come and do what you do?”

Joel
The reason why the event was started is because I went to a lot of Chamber events and I said “you know something, I’m just an attendee. What would I like to see or hear as an attendee vs. their agenda? As an attendee they’re serving me.” In the beginning I kind of copied them. It was a 2-hour event and about 90-minutes into it we’d stop everybody from talking with announcements and this or that and what we did is we’d kill the event. When we told everybody to be quiet for our announcements, they left even though there was another 45 minutes to the event. We stopped doing announcements. We do No announcements. We want it to be a continuous flow of networking and chatting. The only time we’ll do announcement is if we’re doing a giveaway and literally it’s just about at the end to hold the people longer for the venue. We just don’t want to kill the event with that.

Gabe
What do you think about the guys that try to control the crowd and turn it into “we’re going to have 30 minutes of paired networking” and stuff like that?

Joel
If you know what that is then that’s fine. You’re going into that. You may not like it. There’s some events that do speed networking and speed networking is really cool in its own way. You better have business cards. You always get hoarse. At the end of that 30-minutes when you’re talking a minute to each one, it’s so loud you’re screaming over somebody.

Monika
It’s fun.

Joel
But you almost need oxygen.

Monika
And it’s so fast that sometimes you don’t remember afterwards.

Gabe
I’ve been put through that a couple times. Again, I’m sure it was a lot about my attitude but at the end of the day I can’t remember 1 person I’ve ever met speed networking.

Monika
That’s because you don’t give the time to actually remember it. It’s fun because it’s all about trying to get everything through.

Joel
The other thing I wanted to say…and I say this to new people…don’t come with commission breath. Don’t spew…no one cares what you do. You’re here to have a good time. You’re here to connect. You’re here to have fun. What it really started out, because I came from the music business, it was social event for business people. Forget about business. We work hard. Let’s just have fun and it kind of turned itself back into a business event and people wanted tables from my events and what ended up happening is about 3 years ago, 2 years into my Big Events career, is I started the North Atlantic Business Expo and with the North Atlantic Business Expo…again, I watched all the Chambers doing business expos and I had my Big Event each month…I’m going “it’s kind of the same thing. It’s just bigger with a lot of vendor tables.” A lot of people are asking me for tables at my events. I didn’t want to sell them tables. I just wanted it to be a big, fun party, business party and they just kept throwing “hey I want a table…” I said “let’s just start a non-political networking expo.” That’s another story. We could come back and talk about that.

Gabe
Yeah, we’ll come back to that. Right now we’re going to pause for a break and let you guys go to commercial and when you hear our voice you know we’re back. See you guys, Atlanta.

Gabe
Hello Atlanta. Welcome back to Ringer Radio. Check us out online at www.hirearinger.com. Monika stole my sunspot so she’s nice an baking.

Monika
We can also have them call us too at 404-369-0009.

Gabe
That’s a wonderful and good idea. So we’re back with Joel and we’re talking about his[The Big Event] Networking Expos.

Monika
Before we get into the Expos, is it just Joel’s List that they can find out where your events are or is there a website that they can go to.

Joel
The Big Event website is TheBigEvent1.com. Each month you’ll see where the next Big Event is and the next one’s coming up on Monday, May 23rd. That’s at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse in Alpharetta. It’s an amazing place. It’s probably the biggest property they own. They have an event room upstairs that’s really luxurious that holds about 200 people. I highly recommend everybody listening to come on out to The Big Event at Ruth’s Chris, Monday, May 23rd.

Monika
I’m going to be there so maybe I’ll meet somebody interesting.

Gabe
If you’re there from the radio please come up and say “hey.” So let’s jump right back into the Expo. You were telling me a little bit about it. It’s twice a year?

Joel
We hold it twice a year in January and September and all this stuff really came about by an entrepreneurial mind. I kept thinking forward, not looking back. What more could I do? What else could I do? How could I help more people? How could this just be a wonderful event where I’m serving everybody? What happened is I did the 1st anniversary of the first Big Event way back in April of 2013. I figured it would just be a celebration with a lot of people coming. I said “we’ll sell a few vendor tables like we’ve had before” and then people kept calling. We ended up selling about 20 vendor tables. That was The Big Event first anniversary. An Expo wasn’t even thought about. I was like “wow, look at all these people that want to display their wares and talk about their company and get in front of the people that they know come to the event.” It was about June and I’m up in NY at my parents’ house and I’m thinking “you know, I think I can do an Expo. All it is, is more companies.” I wasn’t trying to undercut [the other Expos]. Those big Chamber Expos have big price tags. There’s a lot of things that go on in those arenas. There’s a lot of expenses. If I could do it at a reasonable place, I could have a lower price…I could get the billion dollar company in there, I could get the hundred dollar company in there. So if I have a fair price for everybody, no one will get hurt either way.

Monika
I like your prices. That’s one thing that gets me there. Two people going it’s the same price as 1 person going to one of the bigger networking events.

Joel
We make it fair for the attendees. We make it fair for the vendors. We had the 1st anniversary, that went great. We just had the 4th anniversary at the Hyatt Regency but what happened is after the first one I said “I could do an Expo.” And the first Expo we did we had like 45 companies. We just put it out there and we didn’t know even what to call it. We just came up with North Atlanta Business Expo, keeping it with the Atlanta name because it’s really about the Atlanta Metro Area, it wasn’t about [the counties], it was just a logistical place to have it and we’ve actually done 6 of them. We do them in January. It’s usually a real big one because it’s the end of the year. We do them at the end of January because people are waking up. It’s like joining the gym…”hey it’s been 2 weeks. I’ve got to wake up. I’m a salesperson. I’ve got to get my business going.” So that January Expo, people are loving it. We don’t have any competition until months later and there’s really nothing before it either because you’ve got Thanksgiving. So that January Expo is always explosive.

Monika
Is it at the beginning of January, end of January?

Joel
It’s at the end of January, the 4th week because you’ve got 2 weeks after people waking up and by the 3rd week they’re out there and then the 4th week we bring them right into it. It’s great. And then the one we do at the end of September people are going back to school and we’re running into the 4th quarter. Whatever you’ve done this year, let’s just turbo finish the year by having the Expo at the end of September. To me that just made sense. It just seems to work and it’s spread out enough.

Monika
For those businesses that have budgets that have to be finished up by the end of the year, it’s very smart to give an opportunity for other businesses to go in front of them when they may have a surplus of budget. Especially the January is definitely smart because there is nothing else going on in January.

Joel
We start looking at the companies in November talking about their next year budget. It just coincidentally works out like “this all makes sense.”

Gabe
So the next Expo is going to be when?

Joel
The end of September 2016. We used to hold it at the same place in Alpharetta, called the Metropolitan Club and we’re looking to go there once a year and find something around the perimeter so instead of it always being at the same place, we could draw some more people. It seems like the people in North Metro will always go down the perimeter but it’s hard to get Buckhead and perimeter people to come up but if we could build a new culture and they like what they see they will come up because January will be in Alpharetta and that is always a little bit more people attend it because it’s the beginning of the year so if they like what they see in September they’ll definitely come up in January.

Monika
The last event you just had, which was The Big Event Anniversary Party, that was at a good location.

Joel
The Hyatt Regency was right at the perimeter.

Monika
Next to Villa Christina. So your next event is on May 23rd. You always hold 1 event every month, right?

Joel
Last year we did 2. We were doing Cobb, Gwinnet, Cobb, Gwinnet… There were so many venues that wanted to host it I said “let’s just do it.”

Monika
So give us a good piece of advice. Let’s say a new person comes in. He’s had his business and he’s never really tried networking and he wants to try networking and he comes to your event first. What guidance would you give that person on…because some people get scared about how to approach people or what to say. They don’t know what they’re supposed to do…

Gabe
Some of them have different rules too. I’ve been to one networking thing where business cards are a no-no so if you were to take somebody under your wing for 2 ½ minutes and say “look, this is what you need to know…”

Joel
I’d kind of say the feel of the event…this is the way the other people think in the room. They’ve been to many of these, they know how to act, what’s right, what’s wrong…and I’ll ask them a little about their business and who they’re looking for and there’s usually about 5 people who are just always what I call helpers and I’ll call one of them over and say “here’s a new person.” They love doing introductions and they’ll just bring them around the room. Let’s call them ambassadors. They’ll make them feel at home and not to be afraid of anybody.

Monika
Cool, so if somebody’s new to an event they’ll just ask for an ambassador and they can get to meet some people.

Gabe
I remember that’s exactly what happened with me when I went. I’m the kind of guy that will just sit at the table. Somebody came up to me and started talking and then “alright, come with me.” And starts introducing me around the room.

Monika
Gabe doesn’t just walk up to random people and introducing himself. I do. He can’t do it.

Joel
I didn’t like doing that. I’ll just sit in the corner. I’m a good people watcher.

Monika
Another trick is to just have a drink real quick because it is after hours…

Gabe
…or 4…

Monika
...open your inhibitions a little bit then you can easily talk to a group of people.

Joel
Also at our events, especially if they’re at some kind of restaurant, they give out some kind of discount fliers to promote them to get the people back. We also try to really show off the property and most of the time it’s restaurants and we want people to really come back. That’s what the business owner of that property is hoping. “Yeah, we’re giving you this and giving you that but please come back if you like what you at, what you drank. Come on back, bring your family back…”

Monika
With coming on back, we’ve got to take a quick break and we’ll be right back. Ringer Radio.

Gabe
Hello Atlanta. Welcome back to Ringer Radio. Future Gabe, if you’re listening, you’re still beautiful. Let’s get right back into it. Joel, you said that you were…we’re kind of similar in this way…I played bass for 5 or 10 years…you said you were in the music industry. Tell me how has that segued…

Joel
I played air guitar in the shower. Electric guitar in the shower is not good but it’s wireless now so you won’t get electrocuted. I was in the music business for about 20 years. I’ve been to over 3,000 concerts, toured the world, I’ve been to 40 countries. I was in the business when it was great, from like ’77 to about ’93. I really saw all this stuff in the 70s…I’ve got great stories. I might make a movie.

Gabe
Did you play or were you on the production side?

Joel
So anyway, I was doing business networking events and one of the places where I did an event, the owner had other kinds of businesses and he actually left that business. He called me about 4 months ago and he goes “Listen, I’m going to be doing a music event and I’m looking for a venue.” I actually did a big event at this venue, we became partners and I connected us with the owner of this new venue…it’s called Cosmopolitan…and we’re doing like a classic hip-hop, old school rap, R&B event every Saturday night and it’s just been a lot of fun. It’s upscale kind of people, it’s not street, people dress nice, they come in nice stuff. It’s kind of an upscale club and we just do that every Saturday night. It’s just fun. We go from 9pm – 3am, which is a good chunk of time but they stay late, these people. I’m having fun meeting people and I’m also inviting some of the to The Big Event.

Monika
Awesome. Not to digress but Cosmopolitan has always been an amazing club to me. I think it’s the oldest club in Atlanta that’s still around. It’s still very popular and they do the right thing and work with people like you…

Gabe
So you’re always doing something. If it’s not in the business networking, it’s following your passion and figuring out how to entwine everything.

Joel
About 5 years ago, a friend of mine who had a carpet cleaning company asked me to help him for a little while and I started doing that…

Monika
…that’s one of your other businesses right?

Joel
It was weird, I was carpet cleaning, doing my newsletter, doing events and just all over the place and I decided to go out on my own. It’s completely referral, no advertising, no websites. I figured, I know so many people and the key thing with carpet cleaning, you’re letting people into your house. I just don’t work for strangers, it’s all people I know. They trust me, they give me their garage codes, they give me their keys. Just get it done, I’m not in a rush to do it. My motto is “If I Can’t Get It Clean, Get Hardwoods”. So when I do my Big Events I say “keep spilling that stuff, they’ll call me back to clean the carpets.” It’s my secondary business and I enjoy it. I’m a one-man company, nobody working with me. It’s kind of like therapy. I clean the carpets, I take my time, I’m thinking about everything that I’m doing. It’s good down time actually.

Monika
When you started the networking thing, you didn’t start it to promote this business right?

Joel
No. the networking was first. I just advertise my carpet cleaning within the newsletter and then I’ll send out a blast now and then about carpet cleaning. I’m always at a networking event and there’s always someone who says “I’ve been meaning to call you…” Also, at my events, we always have vendor tables. I don’t really solicit for them but if you’re interested for the Ruth’s Chris we have a couple tables left. You could go to thebigevent3@gmail.com. You could send me an email. I think we have about 4 tables left. The Ruth’s Chris is very sought after. People want those. For the smaller events that I do, we limit it to 1 company per industry, where with the Expos we use our head on that. I have a policy that we limit it to 2 or 4 and we’ll put them in separate corners so it’s not boring to the attendee and you don’t want the vendors…so if I have 2 tech companies I’ll put one on one side and one on the other side. No one’s ever the same exactly so I’ve never had an issue.

Monika
So have you already sold your tech table?

Joel
No.

Monika
There you go. Do you have any questions for us here at Ringer Consulting?

Joel
I know so many people and people are always asking so I always like to hear the simplest way for me to remember what you do so it’s easy and if I hear of someone I go “I have the answer for you. I know who to call.”

Gabe
We build the nerd systems that nobody else wants to touch. Databases and stuff like that when any regular designer or web shop…it’s stuff they get afraid of. Those are the kind of things we really sink our teeth into. Either a website that’s got a lot going on (a website with 40,000 pages). We’ve built some broker systems, which are basically CRM/Contracting Systems that they have something unique about them that nobody wants to touch. We did one where a guy doesn’t deal in cash, he deals in futures. How do you build a system like that? We love getting involved with some of the complicated stuff like that out there [cutting edge type of stuff].

Joel
Is your model for the person beginning a business with minimal budget or…

Gabe
…I’ll work with anybody at any phase. The core of our business is definitely not for the startups but we will work with them exactly where they’re at.

Monika
We work with their budgets. We never want to make a business go broke. All the companies that work with us have been with us for over 8 years so why would we ever want to make a business go broke? If they go broke that’s not going to help us any. We want to make sure they’re gaining money and growing and expanding.

Gabe
We don’t try to oversell. That’s another thing startups would find different from us [talks about how they serve the startup]. We like to work in Construction and Manufacturing, mainly because I strongly believe in manufacturing. I believe in keeping the work here. We don’t outsource ever. That takes away 99% of [the Web Designer’s] market.

Monika
With that said, we are actually closing up on time. We’re running late today. We’ve had a great show.

Gabe
Is it over already? I thought we had another segment.

Joel
Wow. I had fun.

Monika
Again, if you want to reach Joel, you can reach out to him on…

Joel
You can go to joelslist1@gmail.com. But take a look at joelslist.com. You can put your information on there and we’ll get you on the mailing list. The one where you’ll see where The Big Events are is thebigevent1.com. Then for the Expo is northatlanticbusinessexpo.com and you can see all the vendors who have been with us. It’s kind of like a resume of the Expo. With all that information you’ll get a feel for what we do. We try to make business fun. Times are tough sometimes, they’re up, they’re down that’s the way businesses are.

Monika
That’s the life of an entrepreneur.

Joel
We’re moving forward and we just keep getting bigger and bigger and we’re always looking to help people out there.

Monika
Again, May 23rd is the next event [5-8pm at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse]. Thank you guys for listening to us today. If you need to reach out to Ringer Consulting Group you can always do so at www.hirearinger.com or 404-369-0009. Have a wonderful weekend!

Read 719 times Last modified on Friday, 29 July 2016 10:12

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