Wednesday, 18 May 2016 12:34

Ringer Radio Episode 6

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Monika
Good Afternoon, Atlanta. This is Monika Meacham and…

Gabe
This is Gabriel Meacham…

Monika
…with Ringer Radio. We’re coming to you from Ringer Consulting Group and we’re just kicking off the week this week with a little bit of a different layout. We don’t have a guests today. It’s just going to be…

Gabe
…a nice, intimate, little show.

Monika
Yes. Just the 2 of us. We thought we’d eventually go over some questions, FAQs.

Gabe
We’ve been getting a lot of response from the line and from e-mail as well. We just want to go over some of the high level ones that we’re noticing more. We’re going to have a good show, but first we’re going to get into one of my personal favorite topics. It seems like…I just got word…flipping through the phone and Facebook let’s me know all the news that’s relevant…and they’re remaking It.

Monika
Oh the clown movie!

Gabe
It’s going to be a 2-parter, full blown It, and I gotta say, I don’t think there’s ever been another movie and/or concept that’s given me nightmares and…

Monika
It given everyone in a specific generation…

Gabe
…it wakes me up. I don’t know if I’m OK with them remaking it into a 2-parter.

Monika
I’m convinced that from the age of…there’s people that are 10 years older than me, to people that are about my age and a few years younger (I’m 36, by the way), but I’m convinced that that segment of individual has a deeper fear for clowns than any other generation.

Gabe
Yeah. Clowns freak me out. I don’t know about you.

Monika
It’s because of that movie.

Gabe
You sit around, you’re watching…exactly…that’s just GROSS!!

Monika
(showing a picture)

Gabe
Last night we’re sitting around, we’re staring at the baby monitor and roughly about the time I’m thinking this and I stare at it and by God…I saw a little 4-pixel tall clown creeping through the living room and I was like ‘see this is what that movie did to you.’

Monika
Because it was in your mind and you’re seeing killer clowns everywhere. It’s going to be worse now that it’s coming out because they’ll advertise that quite a bit.

Gabe
I’m sorry for all the clowns that are out there that we’re bashing right now.

Monika
Actually you know what’s funny about Gabe? He’s making fun of clowns quite a bit right now but a little-known fact about Gabe is he actually went to Clown College when he was younger.

Gabe
It’s out. You know, when you tell your wife ‘there’s something I want to say to you that I really don’t know that I want anybody else to know about…’ This is after we’re married. I divulged to her…

Monika
…in my justification, when you told me you had something to tell me and you said that you wanted me to keep it a secret, I told you I didn’t know if I could do that, it depended on what it was. Once you told me what it was I said ‘there is absolutely no way I could ever keep that to myself.’

Gabe
I marched in 1 parade and I made little things and yes, I was a clown for a bit. I don’t juggle and don’t do unicycles, so don’t ask!

Monika
Alright so let’s get into some real stuff.

Gabe
Let’s talk about some clown action that happens. As you know, on the show, one of the big things that we do is we talk about the industry and since we’re talking about clowns, we seem to see a whole lot of clowns out there in the industry. They put on the suit, they run around and they even put on a big, red, shiny nose and ask everybody to squeak it to see what happens I don’t know. Let’s dive into that.

Monika
There’s a lot of people out there that claim to do something that they don’t really. Generally you can spot them…

Gabe
…they massage the words a little bit to where technically what they’re claiming is true, but when it gets down to the brass tax it’s only true because they say it’s true. A lot of people are like ‘I’ll guarantee you the #1 ranking on Google.’ And then they leave it there. What does that mean? What you don’t know is they’re going to come back to you after they get your business and say ‘these are the keywords we think you should go after.’ You don’t know any better. That’s how they’re getting that #1 placement. They’re choosing the keywords…not you as the business. They go and they know what’s doable and what’s not doable. Truthfully it doesn’t take much to optimize a site and go after a site for a very uncompetitive keyword that sounds good but it’s not the keyword that the business needs.

Monika
So let’s give a little bit of education to our audience. Keywords…I’m sure most everyone gets what keyword is, but essentially it is the…

Gabe
…this is where we come into our FAQ. The 1st question that we’ve got is when people talk about Google… “Is Google the only one?” No, of course not, but the 1st thing that we talk about when we talk about results or the word SERPs or even rankings…it’s basically when you go to Google, you do a search on whatever you’re doing a search on and it’s the results that you get back. Each one of those individual results is actually called a SERP (Search Engine Result Page). So basically what that means is you do a search, you get back all these results and to normal people it just seems kind of commonplace and whatnot, but when you try to squeeze business value out of that action, there’s a lot more than meets the eye. A lot of those people are there because they’ve earned it. They’ve been there for a long time, they have a lot of good contacts around them, that keyword you put in. Sometimes you’ll notice the side of the page and the top 3 results are paid, which means they paid to be there…they’re paid placement.

Monika
Actually, did you know they’re changing the paid placement to be 4 up top and no more on the sidebar?

Gabe
Really?

Monika
Yup, they did a beta test a few weeks ago or something like that. It’s going to remain that way because the top ones get better results anyway when it comes to getting clicks.

Gabe
That’s really going to suck because one of my strategies was always like “be 7th place on search”. That way you’re over on the side and you’re not really paying those top dollars, but people are seeing your name, they’re seeing your phone number and I’ve always said ‘if my service is better or my customer service is better than the people above me, I’m not worried.” Because what people do is they call the 1st guy and if they don’t get what they want from the 1st guy then they call the 2nd guy and the 3rd guy. In a lot of industries, you have to go down a whole page before you’ll find somebody that will actually answer the phone, so being 7th sometimes doesn’t suck.

Monika
Well, you can still be 7th, just on a different page.

Gabe
So let’s go ahead and dive into the FAQ’s that we have: “What is hosting?” That’s a big question that we get all the time. When you do a search and you pull up a website, that website comes from somewhere and I guess the appropriate answer is: a hosting service is a facility that’s hooked up to a fast data connection and you throw a bunch of computers in that facility and a website is no more than a file that’s being downloaded from a computer somewhere.

Monika
I consider it like the parking lot for the website.

Gabe
Sure.

Monika
It’s where the website parks. Different than the domain. That’s another question that you guys have.

“If I do hosting then my domains are already taken care of.” No, it’s technically separate.

Gabe
Domains are different. That’s the service that says…well all the computers have what’s called IP addresses, which is basically a serial number or a __ address but it’s all numerical. What a domain does is it takes that alpha-numeric .com, .net, dot whatever you want to choose…and it registers and points it to that numerical IP address, which is where your server is located.

Monika
Which is the hosting, the parking…so it points it to that. They’re 2 separate things.

Gabe
Exactly. So kind of like, maybe your domain name is like your GPS and the website is like the car? I don’t know.

Monika
I would say the website is more like the house…the hosting is like the parking lot…

Gabe
I think our analogies are getting all messed up.

Monika
Yeah, it doesn’t work.

Gabe
At this point, what it is is you’ve got a website, it’s got to get hosted somewhere, OK?

Monika
So with all that hosting and domain nonsense let’s go ahead and take a quick break. We’ll come back and hit some more of these questions that we have on things that everyone needs to know about your online and your website and your business. Ringer Radio.

{Commercial Break}

Gabe
Hey and now we’re back with Ringer Radio again. If you haven’t checked out our website you need to. It’s www.hirearinger.com. We’re going to go ahead and talk a little bit more about Analytics and Adwords and basically not wasting money. If you’re going to spend money online, you really want to take the time to analyze where you’re spending it, how you’re spending it and what’s giving you the most bang for your buck. With that said, Monika…

Monika
…well first and foremost, before you ever think of doing any advertising budget or spend or anything like that, you do that for something that is good and once you get you clients they’re actually going to stay there. You want to make sure that’s the first thing that’s done. You have a good website or a good landing page, the campaign makes sense and everything like that, before you actually go and spend money. But once you start spending money there’s so much you can do. You can actually see if what you have up is working and tweak that as you go. Reviewing your Adwords against your Analytics and getting an understanding of your end users…how their behavior is, setting goals…you can actually set goals in Analytics. So Analytics is a tool that can be used, but essentially what it is, it’s a code that’s put in the background of a website. Most websites you can have it there. There’s a handful you’ll have issues with…

Gabe
…it’s like some of the automated builders and stuff like that. They have their own version. So when we build out a custom website, we make sure we install Google Analytics and Google Webmaster Tools. Both things are provided free from Google so we might as well have our customers use it.

Monika
Absolutely. There’s one thing that you need to be aware of it’s when it comes to Google Analytics, it has to be on the site when you want to start looking at your data points, meaning the activity that’s going on on your site. You can’t go and put Analytics after the fact and then be like ‘OK, I’m going to put Analytics on today and then go see what happened 3 months ago.’ No, the code has to be there in order to really see what was going on with the site and the activity.

Gabe
Now most hosting platforms also have their own form of Analytics, which is the raw hosting Analytics. It’s nowhere near as vast as what Google Analytics shows you but you can get some raw numbers but they’ll never, ever match up. The hard part is having somebody that’s an analyst looking at…

Monika
Yeah because there’s a lot in there from looking at the behavior of the individual, meaning “how many pages did they go to? What pages did they go to? How many minutes did they stay on each page? What were they looking at? What was engaging them?” Because at the end of the day, the longer you have an end user on your website, the more possibility it will be to convert them to a client.

Gabe
Then that kind of gets us into a little bit of AB Testing. AB Testing is something that generally happens after site launch when you’re wanting to refine things down. Utilizing Google Adwords is figuring out what ad is the best to kind of attract somebody to the site initially, and then using AB Testing on the site itself, saying ‘OK I’m going to take half of my traffic and I’m going to send it to this version of the page that has this snippet that’s slightly different than the other one.’ and keep on AB Testing until you figure out…

Monika
…well there’s a lot of…that’s not the only…I wouldn’t say that’s the only facet of AB Testing as well. There’s other forms as well. The timing of when your ad should be up…the type of people that look at your ads at specific times…I mean, you can change and tweak the dial in so many different ways when it comes to your Adwords…from the time that it’s released, to remarketing, to sending it to specific email addresses…

Gabe
…to being on the display networks. Going ahead and having some banner ads made up and put in there…

Monika
…what kind of display networks work? What kind of sites work? I mean there’s so much to it because each end user is going to have a different way of how they interact with your site. And there are groups that you can group it in and see who’s giving you the most money at the end of the day. Who’s buying your highest value products when they convert? Where is your dollar better going in? So there is a way to fine tune and tweak it.

Gabe
Don’t waste your dollars!

Monika
Yeah there’s a lot of good businesses, once they get to a point and they have a certain budget that they’re spending, that they go and they get a professional that knows Analytics and knows how to read and interpret what’s going on and make sure you get the most value.

Gabe
If we have any listeners out there that are questioning…they’ve had an Adwords account and never really messed with it. It got set up by somebody way back when and it’s been on autopilot…one of the things that we do at our office is provide a free audit where we go in and look through, currently what you have going on and just give you our opinion. If any of our listeners want to take advantage of that just simply call the number and we’ll be happy to…

Monika
…we do manage those accounts and help our quite a few people doing that.

Gabe
Absolutely. So let’s dive into a question that’s related, but it’s the big question of the day. “How much should a website cost?” If you look around online it’s absolutely the #1 question that’s asked by anybody in the FAQs, it was the #1 question that we were asked when we put out the thing. A lot of people have been approached by a website builders that cost anywhere form $1,000 - $5,000…

Monika
…shoot, some of them are $500.

Gabe
…and then some of them you see on Shark Tank, people are paying $400,000 for one. You scratch your head and you go ‘well what does a website cost and what constitutes a good website?’ Really it comes down to, in my mind, the amount of…we’re more of a fair company, I guess. A lot of companies sell on value and they think that if a company can afford $50,000 then that’s what you charge them. We do ours based on hourly and we take our best guess about exactly how long the creative would take, how long…

Monika
…we don’t believe in the package prices. We do have some package prices on the lower end to help out those really small companies that just can’t afford our true prices…

Gabe
…but that’s really not a packaged website, it’s packaged time. ‘We’re going to spend 10 hours gathering photography and 5 hours with the designer and we’re going to have 25 hours with the coder…’ and given those factors, generally you have a pretty nice looking website that a small business can take advantage of. What do you think in terms of pricing?

Monika
I think it depends on the company. What it depends on is it depends on the business that’s asking because yes, if you are a small person that is in your own shop, you have no admiration of growth, you just want to do your craft, you have a hobby or something that makes enough money and generates money for you to bring in, making baskets, I don’t know, something small. If you have no ambition for growth then a builder site is just fine. If you can market it yourself and go do the social and everything like that…

Gabe
…to me, the question is like asking the business ‘well how much should your building cost?’ There are a lot of factors. If you’re a company that’s all about the brand and all about appearing big and whatnot, you can dump a couple million dollars into a real nice building because of the foyer…

Monika
…and that’s how a website is. The more time you spend on creative, the more time you spend on…the higher change you’re going to convert a high-end customer.

Gabe
Also it depends on how many players there are in determining what that end result is going to look like. Whenever we get in a room and I’ve got 5 people that are staring at me and they’re all asking me how much their website is going to cost and I look around and say ‘OK so how many points of contact do I have? How many approval processes do I have to go through to make these people happy?’ If there are 5 people in the room t’s going to cost somebody but if I have to make 1 person happy and it’s got to be the best website that 1 person has ever seen, then I know how to limit my hours. I just cater to what their taste is.

Monika
At the end of the day it’s all about time and I think that the way we do business at Ringer Consulting Group is a fair way because it is about time and we can work with somebody who may want a killer website one day but right now they can’t afford it so we build them their tricycle and we end up eventually, through time, because it’s custom, we keep adding to it, refining it, fine tuning it, to where it becomes a Ferrari one day.

Gabe
A tricycle that turns into a Ferrari?

Monika
You never know! You could put some walls on it and some windows and electricity…

Gabe
…I want one of those…put a jetpack on that little tricycle and…

Monika
…it could happen…

Gabe
I’m liking this. Alright, with that we’re going to go ahead and turn you over to our advertisers and thank you guys for listening. Catch us when we come back.

{Commercial Break}

Monika
Good Afternoon, Atlanta. This is Ringer Radio back with you. Again, I wanted to point out our question and answer phone line that we set up in case you all have any questions for us or you want us to talk about anything specific on the radio. Going over anywhere from online to websites to business to even marriage and business because that might be one of our topics coming up soon…

Gabe
…it’s not easy.

Monika
The number is 404-369-0738. So we were just talking about ads and spending money and conversions and websites and costs…

Gabe
…and all that glorious stuff that nobody really wants to pay attention to but we’re going to force our audience to know.

Monika
Well the problem is that you can’t really give an answer. It just depends on each case study. It depends on each client. If somebody’s giving a cookie-cutter price and they’re like ‘Oh, it’s this much.’ Well, that’s because they’re giving you a cookie-cutter website, which may be right for you at the time but it depends. If it’s a very small business…

Gabe
You’re so much better saving your pennies and getting with somebody…I mean look, we’ve done sites for the right people where you walk in, we believe in what they’re doing. We’ve done full-blown, custom websites at cookie-cutter basement prices, just based on liking the person. My piece of advice is just pick up the phone, call us. Other than that just run away. So what’s the next question that you have on your list over there that people have sent?

Monika
One of the questions we got was “How long have you been doing websites for?”

Gabe
Me? The first website I did was actually a search engine.

Monika
A search engine?

Gabe
Yeah, I got hired by a company called Extension Technology. They bought and sold computer components and people would go and search on their website for stuff all the time, so we developed a search engine called Part Funnel.

Monika
How long ago was this?

Gabe
This was 1999.

Monika
Wow, so 2 centuries ago, almost or the last century.

Gabe
My first real website I put together was a basic search engine that I actually programmed it in Classic ASP and it searched through like 5 or 6 different databases that we had access to…

Monika
Was that still the big AOL days or was that…?

Gabe
Yeah, one of the big concerns was ‘what about people with dial up?’ It was still like ‘don’t use heavy graphics because people on dial up it takes forever for them to load.’ It’s amazing how that’s changed in the last…

Monika
So how has the website changed in that span of time? 17 years.

Gabe
It goes through these waves, where first it’s like big and robust because as soon as everybody started adopting broadband, Flash was the biggest thing. So websites consisted of Flash which could be like a 50 meg file, which at the time was like ‘why would you ever have a 50 meg file? That’s way too big.’ But now I look back at that 50 meg file and I’ve got individual graphic files that are in the graphic tables, that 50 megs loads up in like no time flat.

Monika
So a lot of people may not understand what you’re talking about right now. The website has all the graphics. There’s a size complexity to every website when you’re hosting it. It’s the host that’s holding all that storage for you. That’s why you pay them, of course.

Gabe
You can have all kinds…as far as size goes…the complexity of the site is more about the images that go on it. We’ve got sites that are small enough to fit on a normal little floppy disk…a 1.4 meg floppy…there’s really no graphics to it. It’s just a bunch of words, so we’ve got sites that are hosted like that and then we have a couple of sites that won’t even fit on a hard drive.

Monika
Right and those…

(Talking Simultaneously)

Gabe
Smoke Signal’s got so much graphics on there. They’ve got 5 years worth of articles that they’ve been pumping out, so it takes up…so a website can range, in terms of that kind of complexity too.

Monika
I’m sure ours is pretty hefty because we’ve got video in ours and video is hefty in itself.

Gabe
I have a little trick. What I do is I have a Vimeo account and I put all my video on that Vimeo account and then when the page loads, the video streams from Vimeo and all the other page content streams from our website, so really it’s actually kind of twice as quick.

Monika
Vimeo, for everybody who doesn’t know…it’s kidn of like YouTube…

Gabe
…it’s just a professional version that you pay into that’s a higher quality, archival quality, if you will.

Monika
So, OK, you did the search engine in 1999. When did you do your first real website like a company website?

Gabe
First we had an extension technology website that I…during my 5 years there we probably rebuilt it 5 or 6 times. I was learning new tricks and CSS was just kind of coming into play or how to style a website was coming into play…

Monika
…so that was in the 2000s right?

Gabe
Yeah…

Monika
What was the overall look of websites then? Was it the box? Was it Profix? Was there words?

Gabe
It was pretty much box and graphics and dancing Jesus’ and stuff like that. Homer’s website. Everybody’s seen the episode. The more stuff you can throw on there the more you can charge for it. It was awesome. I did a really cool website, kind of freelance while I was still working for this company called Keith’s Cheesecakes and it was in Flash. I still miss Flash. I’m kind of mad at Apple…that’s probably why I’ve never really adopted their products…because Flash was such a great language and there’s really no reason it got shut down like it did. I was working on a website. Flash was a sort of graphical way of building a website.

Monika
Why did it get shut down? Apple didn’t adopt it?

Gabe
Apple kind of folded their arms and said ‘we don’t want Flash on our phones.’ This was back when MacroMedia still owned Flash.

Monika
I’ve never even heard of MacroMedia.

Gabe
Yeah, MacroMedia was still Flash and then Adobe bought and then there’s the whole Apple thing that happened. But basically, back to my story is, I liked Flash a lot because it was a lot like programming a video game and it did full screen really well and it was very graphical and you had to learn a little bit of action script, but it was just as easy as PHP really. If you’re going to learn a language, you could have learned that one pretty easy. So I made this website which was for a cheesecake company and the menu of it was you took different slices from the top of the cheesecake and you put it down into the content body and it loaded up all the…and it did it in such a smooth way and it still…using all the technology we have now…in a way, from an artistic standpoint, still superior to what we can do now. Now, Flash is still out there. It got adopted mostly by the video game industry because it’s really easy and useful for creating stuff like video games.

Monika
But it’s not good for websites.

Gabe
Well, you can export Flash as canvas objects, so yes, now.

Monika
So if somebody came to you and said ‘hey I got a website done and it was in Flash.’ Would you be happy for them, sad for them, or tell them ‘why’d you do that?’

Gabe
Right now I’d be sad for them because they’d be 15 years behind, because again, it’s still not accepted industry practice. If you’re going to have Flash as part of the site, it’s probably…it’s been weeded out quite a bit but it still might be the header of the site. So you have stuff going on around the header, you probably may have a main content piece when you pull up a site and it will have some Flash on it. It won’t be Flash though, it will have been converted over into a canvas object, which is regular HTML 5 adopted standard. Really, the only reason that Adobe had to do that was because of Apple. So Apple, shame on you.

Monika
So really there’s 2 main ones right now that you should be getting which is HTML 5 type of site, which means there’s no Content Management System or anything like that…

Gabe
No, no. HTML 5 is, HTML 5. If you have a Content Management System it would be PHP but remember PHP is just the processing language. The output is always HTML. What your browser always sees is HTML.

Monika
OK, so you make sure that you’re getting HTML.

Gabe
If you have PHP or any kind of process that’s happening server side, and you request a response from the server, the server does all the action and then spits back out the HTML that the browser is used to seeing.

Monika
A whole bunch of gibberish.

Gabe
It’s not gibberish. It’s very straightforward.

Monika
It just helps me know that you know what you’re talking about.

Gabe
This is nerd central 101.

Monika
So at the end of the day, essentially he’s been doing websites for a very long time…since 1999.

Gabe
Over the course of that I’ve probably built about 300 websites. 360 something.

Monika
More than 300 because it was 300 two years ago.

Gabe
I’ve been really slow. We’ve been doing big projects and they take half a year. So a while.

Monika
With that said, we are going to take another break and we’ll come back to you. Again, this is Gabe and Monika Meacham with Ringer Consultant Group today on Ringer Radio.

{Commercial Break}

Gabe
Remember Ringer…Dot Com!!!

Monika
You mean hire a ringer…

Gabe
Let’s get right back into the question and this is Ringer Radio Dot Com. So the next question that we have is “Can you help update a website or work on a website that another firm built?” I think this is one of the things that actually makes us a little bit different in the marketplace. A lot of companies will say “no”. Unless that website is 100% built and signed off on, they don’t want to be liable for whatever may go wrong if they touch the content. We have some common sense rules but our general answer is actually “Yes.”

Monika
Unless it’s a builder site. If it’s a builder site we can help with marketing. We can’t really touch the website. It’s a rented site.

Gabe
At the end of the day, if somebody calls us and says ‘look, I have a builder site built on Wix and I don’t have time and I just want like 5 pictures added to it.’ Yeah, we’re going to jump in Wix and we’re going to add the 5 pictures because that’s what the customer asked us to do. Now is that our preferred, what we would like to do? No. Of course we would like to do it our own way and do it custom, from scratch and all that, but most of the people that come to us like this are in Dupral or WordPress, Joomla or MODX…

Monika
…those are all back end Content Management Systems…

Gabe
The big question is “can you work on my site?” We’re pretty confident and if it’s a PHP System or a dot net based system, then yeah, absolutely we can work on your site. We take precautions before we engage and actually change anything on the site. We do a full back-up and make sure we have a full, viable back-up to where if we mess anything up, we can instantly go right back to where we were. So that’s kind of what our process is to help us cover our butt a little bit.

Monika
A big thing we’re doing right now is actually turning current sites into Responsive sites and that, a lot of times, is by other people or other firms…

Gabe
…other artists…

Monika
…had the website and we’d go in and

Gabe
…sometimes it could be a bit tricky but a lot of times we can pay good respect to that artist, not mess up their design and still produce a responsive version of the site. The whole process we’re really talking about is website adoption. We would like that once we do a good job with somebody’s update or whatever…that they’d sit it with us at some point and talk about how we do a really good job with the site.

Monika
And again, for those that just may have not heard it in other shows: Responsive basically means the site changes size based on the device viewing the website.

Gabe
Changes the complete layout.

Monika
Yeah, layout changes everything from the phone to the tablet to the desktop. So another question we have is: “How long does it take to build a website out?”

Gabe
Well, for a typical website it takes us approximately 90 days. That’s what we ask for and really that’s just because there’s a lot of back and forth with businesses and while it may really only take us 10 days, if you slammed all the days together to produce it…one day in design…could we get it done in 10 days? Yes. If we had nothing else going on.

Monika
We have other projects going on…

Gabe
…and there’s a lot of back and forth between the client and…

Monika
..and there’s the creative moment. Sometimes you’ll sit there looking at a website and you’re going to be like ‘what do I envision for this site?’ It takes time for that to come to you to be able to be like ‘oh, this is where I see the client going.’ Because at the end of the day, you’ve got to think about your end users. That’s why the site is being built by a professional, by someone that is taking the time and that charges what we charge.

Gabe
I call it iterative improvements, meaning I have the lay out in front of me. I’m happy with it for tonight. The next morning I walk in and I see 5 new things that I need to change and then at the end of the night I’m happy with it and then I walk in the next day and I see 4 more things that I need to change. Iterative improvement means at some point you just have to stop looking at the page and walk away, get refreshed, so that way you can come back and go “OK, I’m thinking about it a little differently now.’

Monika
Right and then you also show it across to other designers and get their opinion as well.

Gabe
And the customer. The customer is constantly involved. Some people have come to us and said ‘how long does it take to build a website.’ And we say ‘we ask 90 days.’ That’s what’s comfortable for us, within projects between X amount and X amount and…

Monika
…that’s a full blown website.

Gabe
Right. We ask for it and they go ‘oh OK.’ And they expect that they’re going to disappear for 90 days and they’re going to come back and it’s going to be done. The truth is that isn’t nearly the furthest thing from the truth.

Monika
There’s always tweaks and additions that we do later on.

Gabe
Every project that we’re working on usually our customer gets a phone call at least once a week to ask ‘this is the progress. What’s your opinion on this?’ They have direct access to our file upload so they can see it being built as it’s being built. So we’re much more hands-on with our customers than maybe some other people might be.

Monika
Yeah, much more visible.

Gabe
And that’s why we also ask what we consider to be a little bit more time because there’s other people…there’s Website Tonight…they’ll put together a website…

Monika
…there are 24 our turn-around website builders out there but again, it’s not being built for your end user.

Gabe
Well the only question hat they’ll have is ‘what would you like for your header graphic? What color would you like? What fonts would you like?’ Past that, they don’t really care because that’s all they’re producing.

Monika
Because there’s no content going into it, there’s no imagery.

Gabe
Which brings to another question that we’ve been asked: “Do we help write content?” Actually that’s a big part of what we do is we sit around and we think tank for a while and we pass the ideas around and we kind of think ‘if I was your customer, what would I need to be told? How would I need to be romanced into becoming a full blown client?’ We come up with all these ideas, we go to our clients and kind of pitch. Sometimes it works, they love it and it makes it so much easier to get that ad spend or it makes it so much easier to get the resource money needed to get that vision out because you did the hard part. You came up with the inspiration conception. We love being part of that.

Monika
It’s not even just the website, it goes all over advertising in itself…

Gabe
…also on video. Video’s the same thing. There are plenty of firms out there that do video but I’d wager to say we treat video with as much respect as the website side of things as well.

Monika
Absolutely. We’re constantly upgrading our equipment from professional camera to the B rolled cameras that are just as good to lighting to everything.

Gabe
Just this weekend we got a new wireless lapel system…

Monika
…because we’re going out to a client’s site and his place is a little bit more noisy than the previous places we’ve gone to so we said ‘we need better sound quality.’ So we went out and made sure that we got that because we’re going on Thursday to go do some more video for him. So it’s a constant thing of upgrading our resources in order to give the best end product to our clients and make sure that people convert because of that. At the end of the day, when we see our clients succeed, we get that same feeling of success.

Gabe
So tying right into this, and I know we’re getting kind of late with the show so I’m going to try to cram in as much as possible…another question is “What software do you use?” and while we’re on that “Do you give us the source files from that software?” We’re an Adobe Shop so we use Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, In Design, After Effects, Premier. I use DreamWeaver as a glorified Notepad. I don’t use their layout tools but DreamWeaver has one heck of a code view that I love to use so we’re an Adobe Shop as far as that goes. We use other programs for like spellcheck, you use MicroSoft Office and Word…

Monika
Yeah, we’re not great spellers.

Gabe
The question of “do we get the source file”…yes. I don’t ever try to put handcuffs on my customer. I always try to do the exact opposite. I’ve always done this just as a general habit and I think that’s why people kind of like me…anytime I produce something, even if they don’t have the software to where they can view it, they still have the file. If I drop dead they can go somewhere and still have all the files.

Monika
Which most developers don’t do that…

Gabe
…a lot of them don’t. It’s a big argument. I see it online.

Monika
They don’t want to give out their passwords to the backend of the site when they’ve paid for it in full for the site.

Gabe
At the end of the day, when we produce something, it’s highly likely that the customer will get a CD with everything that went into that website…all the Photoshop files, all the Illustration things. We don’t try to keep people…

Monika
We want them to stay with us because they want to stay with us.

Gabe
The other benefit to that is if they come back in a year and my computer has died, which has happened, they have a copy of all the work that I produced. When you part ways with a customer and they say ‘OK we’re going to go do this for a while’ or whatever, you don’t know if you’ll ever see them again. But it’s really nice when you hand them the CD and then if they’re off doing their own thing, I’m no longer obligated to…I do keep copies, I’m not an idiot, but at least I know if the customers ever come back they have all the files I would need also.

Monika
With that said, you get to keep your stuff with Ringer. So we’ve had a great day today. Hope you guys enjoyed just listening to me and Gabe rant on and on and next week we’ll have probably a new guest for you guys. Again, if you have any questions for us, here at Ringer Radio, you can give us a call at 404-369-0738. If you have any questions about Ringer Consulting Group and what we do, anywhere from Adwords Management to building a website to just doing content updates or changing your site to Responsive or even video, give us a call. Our number is 404-369-0009 or you can reach us at www.hirearinger…

Gabe
DOT COM!!

Monika
Have a great day.

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Read 1398 times Last modified on Wednesday, 18 May 2016 15:11

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