Tuesday, 16 February 2016 17:21

Ringer Radio Episode 4

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Have you ever wondered what steps someone would take when creating a liquor brand and importing the product from another country? In this episode we speak with Jacob Gluck, CEO and Founder of Goza Tequila. We walk through how he began his journey, where he is today and what the future can bring him. Listen along as we discuss Goza Tequila from running the business to marketing the brand.

Monika
Good Afternoon everyone out in Atlanta. This is Ringer Radio, with Gabe and Monika Meacham. Today we have an extra special guest, who’s brought in some beverages for us to consume while we’re having the show today.

Gabe
And I must admit we kind of got into it early because it’s really, really good.

Monika
Yeah it is. So we have Jacob Gluck with us here from Goza Tequila. Hello Jacob.

Jacob
Hello. Good to be here. Thanks for having me.

Monika
Definitely. So we decided to bring Jacob on. We said, let’s bring somebody in who’s young, trying to go out there and do it, trying to build an image, a brand and you know, especially in an area like Tequila, which is what he has…Goza Tequila. There’s a lot of branding, a lot of imagery, a lot of…people need to know who you are or they will never purchase you because it’s a big marketplace out there.

Gabe
Image is absolutely everything in this market.

Jacob
The brands’ the thing. Indeed.

Gabe
We’re going to dive right in…tell me, first of all, tell me a little bit about your product.

Jacob
Goza is an ultra premium, hand crafted, 100% De Gava Tequila. We have the 3 main types you’ll see out in the market…we have Blanco, which is also called Silver, sometimes. That is unaged, that’s why it’s quite clear. We have Reposado, which means rested. Reposado is aged for 6 months in white oak barrels. That’s what gives it a slightly darker tint…it’s getting that from the barrels. And then we have an Anejo product. Anejo measns aged and that’s aged even more. That’s aged for 1 year in white oak barrels so it’s even darker.

What I’ve learned is everyone has their favorite. It’s not necessarily like wine where the more aged it is, the better, no matter what.  For example, I like Reposado the most. Some people like Blanco. Blanco what’s sold most in this country but some people like Anejo so it just depends on the pallet. If you’re more of a whiskey drinker you’re going to go more with the darker, the Reposado and Anejo, if you’re more Vodka, you might go more Blanco, but again, there’s really no rules. So that’s about the product itself.

Gabe
Where can you pick this stuff up?

Jacob
We are currently in over 70 liquor stores in the greater Atlanta area. We’re looking to grow that to a couple hundred by the middle of the year. Greens, Tower, those are 2 very good stores that sell a lot of Goza, that we love. We’re in about 250 bars and restaurants as well, in the greater area. Actually, if you go to our website: gozatequila.com, there’s a ‘where to buy’ and it’s a map and you can see. Those are some of the places, but we’re all around the city.

Monika
You started out, what was it, a year ago?

Gabe
Take me all the way back to the beginning where you’re sitting on your couch and you’re like ‘what am I going to do?’

Jacob
I was a stockbroker, actually. In DC, I went to the University of Maryland and stayed around DC. Loved the stock market. I learned a lot, but I felt entrepreneurial and also, no wife, no kids, no mortgage…

Gabe
…you had ultimate freedom…

Monika
…you’re saying that with a little bit of bitterness there, Gabe.

Gabe
I remember freedom.

Jacob
I’m engaged now. Like I was saying, I liked the stock market, but I always felt entrepreneurial and I wanted to give running a business a shot and that would be the time. So I left DC and came back to Atlanta…this is where I’m from…it’s a long story, but to make it short, I had a connection to a producer of Tequila. They had their own brand and they wanted us to sell their brand. I wasn’t as into that but I thought ‘if I create a brand, will they fill it?’ there’s only 150, or so, producers of Tequila in the world. Not everyone knows…

Monika
…that’s it?

Jacob
…yeah, that’s it. Tequila’s got to come from a certain region of the world. It’s like champagne. That’s a law…US law, Mexican law.

Monika
It’s like scotch because scotch is the same way. It has to come from Scotland in order to be scotch.

Jacob
Mostly all in Jalisco, the certain region in Mexico and as y’all just tasted, thank you for saying it’s a great product.

Gabe
Is it because of the climate there or is it mostly political?

Jacob
I think it’s a little of both. It has a lot to do with agave in the land. I think it’s more that than it is political but it’s a little of both, I would imagine. It’s how things are. But there is certain soil and there are certain traditions in Mexico where the agave can be grown. So that’s what happened.

So in the beginning I came back, living with my parents, started in really January 2013 is when I said ‘ok I’m going for it. Not doing anything else and going to give this a go.’ That was day 1…

Gabe
…your first thought was Tequila, why not?

Jacob
Actually that’s good point. It wasn’t so random. There was this opportunity with this producer. I said ‘ok, maybe this is an opportunity.’ What attracted me was the dynamic nature of the business. You’re talking about a business that has branding and marketing, advertising and sales and this whole operational piece…it’s logistics and you have manufacturing. There’s a huge legal and regulatory. There’s distribution…

Gabe
…import/export all that…

Jacob
So what attracted me too was that I could learn a lot of things.

Gabe
That’s going to be the hardest thing I’ll possible ever do…let’s do it!

Jacob
Exactly. Because then if it doesn’t work out I can be like ‘it was so hard.’ Plus I feel like and I felt like there was room in the Tequila market for something new. Looking onto the shelves…

Monika
…Patron…I want to say Patron’s the last one that I remember as a big brand. And it’s a long time ago that that one really…

Gabe
…Straight up 80’s right?

Jacob
They’re still killing it. What Kleenex is to tissue, Patron is to Tequila.

Monika
Oh really?

Jacob
Yeah, they’re still crushing it.

Monika
It’s been a long time though, is what I mean to say. Not like the Vodka world. In the Vodka world they’re a dime a dozen. It seems like it always a new brand coming out…

Jacob
…right so the barrier to entry in Vodka, is also way less, so it’s a double-edged sword. What makes Tequila…there’s such a high barrier to entry, you’re talking about Mexico and deportation and…

Gabe
…did you have to go down there and set all that up…

Jacob
…yeah, the Goza team was just down there actually like 3 weeks ago. I’ve been down for that purpose 4 times to Laredo, right on the boarder Nuevo Laredo, we’re a federal importer, so going down there. That also was exciting at a certain point, getting your hands dirty and really doing business really, really excited me, but looking onto the shelves, I saw a lot of the same really masculine, square, stocky bottles…very traditional, I think might be the word. You can think of some of the most iconic brands…Patron, Aradora and 1800. So a philosophy behind Goza is taking the intimidation out of Tequila.

Gabe
I’m looking at the branding and I’m looking at the bottling of it and you do have the traditional Mexican elements in it, the skull and the drink and whatnot, but it’s all done in such a way that it would be very friendly and inviting and it’s not something that…

Jacob
…it’s scary. There is…

Gabe
…it’s like a cartoon scary…

Jacob
…we’ve got this amazing pop artist named Berton Morris to do this artwork, which is one of the luckiest breaks ever and he created something that does pay homage to the traditions but if you look at the bottle, you can see in the artwork you see shot glasses…

Gabe
…it looks fun…

Jacob
…it looks fun…

Gabe
…and clouds are very in the back. It’s very fun.

Jacob
It’s a really different style and he has a really instantly recognizable type of style, type of artwork style, and Goza means enjoy and to have fun. So a lot of it it’s all playing into the same thing. At the end of the day you need someone to walk into a liquor store, see your bottle and say ‘I could see myself drinking that.’ Y’all are consumers, you know. You walk into a liquor store and it’s kind of fair game.

Gabe
Alright and with that, we’re going to take a quick break. Join us back for a little bit more information about Goza Tequila.


Monika
Welcome back, everyone to Ringer Radio with Monika and Gabe Meacham. Today, again, we have with us, Jacob Gluck from Goza Tequila and one quick thing I wanted to let everybody know…if anybody has any questions out there, either for ourselves, me or Gabe, or even for Jacob, you can call us at a number that we’ve set up. It’s 404-369-0738. Leave us a message and we’ll get back to your question and get the answer for you for the next show.

Gabe
So that will be really cool…get some voices out there. Jacob, back to you, let’s pick up right where we left off. Obviously, you’ve done an amazing job with the branding and you’re at that point, you’ve got distribution. Atlanta distribution started…

Monika
…do you have anywhere else? I think you mentioned other states…

Jacob
…Nashville and Chattanooga and we’re growing to North Carolina and South Carolina this year.

Gabe
So at this point the business is all about the hustle of getting out there in front of…

Jacob
…a lot of hustle.

Monika
So do you have state regulations you have to worry about before you enter these other states? Can you just kind of go everywhere in the US? How does that work?

Jacob
The regulatory part’s a big piece of it so 18 of the 50 states do not have privatized distribution. The distributor is the state of North Carolina. You’ve heard of ABC Stores, Alcohol Beverage Control…so you have the Alabama Liquor Control Board. By law, it’s a 3-tier system, so I can’t sell directly to John’s Bar. That changes things, so in North Carolina, for example, it’s not privatized distribution, you’re working with the state, they have a different approval process, the whole deal. And then within states there are different laws. Some states, you can only have 1 distributor. Some states you can have many. So it is a big piece.

Monika
So one thing I want to educate the listeners on, you keep saying private distribution…so basically you’re only distributing this one product. A lot of other alcohols out there get distributed by this big mass company and sent around, correct?

Jacob
Not exactly. What I mean is that it’s a private company. If you’re a national distributing company, that’s a private company whereas The Alabama Liquor Control Board is who would buy our product in Alabama.

Gabe
Interesting. I never even realized it was actually the state that gets involved.

Jacob
Every state has different laws, approvals, you have to bring it in front of a board…

Gabe
Do they all get to taste it like we do and say ‘cheers…’

Jacob
I’ve never been in a meeting, but I imagine they do. It’s completely different. Every state it’s different pricing for that reason…different taxes for every state, different required gross profit margins for liquor stores. If you go to North Carolina, you would see, for example, a brand, let’s say Goza, at the same price in every store. You know, in Atlanta, you never would see that. So it really is very regulated…

Monika
…wow, there’s no other products out there that has a mandatory gross profit margin to be able to…what a great industry to be in.

Jacob
Goza doesn’t have a mandatory…it is a great business to be in. we’re lucky. We have great distributors and distribution is so important. They’re partners. You sell to them, technically, but you work with them…the whole purpose is to work together to sell more Goza.

Gabe
So what have been your main struggles getting it to where you are today? Where have you missed the mark and/or not hit a homerun? It’s my show and I can tell you forever…

Jacob
…infinite strikeouts…

Gabe
…the struggle that the average entrepreneur will be able to listen and go ‘oh yeah, it all makes sense because it’s not always going to be easy, easy, peasy, go cash the check, we’re done. It’s going to be hard, hard, hard, hard…hopefully cash a check and then wait another 6 months then hard, hard, hard, hard…’

Jacob
You’re spot on. I could speak to a lot of things. I want to say first and foremost, during the struggles, at the beginning, it was just me but in time I’ve been able to build a great team of people around me who have made those struggles more bearable and better. So to entrepreneurs out there, you’re not going to be able to do it alone. The main thing that I learned, that I didn’t see coming was that it’s emotional stamina…that’s what I call it. It’s emotional stamina is what it takes to separate…

Monika
…that’s a very good phrase…

Jacob
…it’s true. It’s what it takes. You’re getting up in the morning and there’s no promise of any paycheck or anything and you’re working and it’s like watching grass grow. You watch it everyday like ‘this ain’t growing.’ Or maybe, in 6 months, 3 months you come back to the grass and you’re like ‘wow, that happened.’ Constantly, it’s hard to benchmark ‘am I progressing fast enough or not fast enough?’

Gabe
One of those matrixes you would use anyway. You have to make up your own matrixes for success and failure.

Jacob
Exactly. You gotta get out of bed and day 1 you’re like ‘I have 20 minutes of work.’ Day 2 it’s like 21 minutes of work. Week 3 it’s like 34 minutes of work. Week 6, it’s 2 hours of work. Trying to figure things out, it can be extremely frustrating, but the key is, like I sort of alluded to, be the dumbest guy in the room. That’s really the trick in…

Gabe
…that’ snot a trick. I’ve been doing that my whole life.

Jacob
That’s the best thing it’s like ‘what do I know about making bottles?’ nothing. Putting effort into finding someone who does and letting them give you advice and be a part of it…

Monika
So basically listen…

Jacob
Absolutely. The more…actually my mom gave me this advice…she said the less you talk in an interview, the smarter the person will think you are. They’ll walk out of the interview going ‘I really like that Jacob guy.’ They talk about themselves the whole time, which is great too because…but it’s really, really important, like I don’t know anythng, teach me please. Without the team around me it just wouldn’t be the same. Some of the struggles had to do with manufacturing. It’s hard to know. If a marketing firm says it costs you $3,000 for this, when you start out you don’t have it to compare. Is $3,000 good or am I overpaying? What do I get? Made a ton of mistakes there. The stuff with the boarder in Mexico…you’re dealing with 2 countries and I thought…this was a huge oversight where I was very wrong in thinking that Mexico was going to be lacks. It’s Mexico. It’s opposite. Way more aggressive than America.

Gabe
What kind of information…what are they looking for? Do they check the product? What is it that they’re looking for?

Jacob
So there’s something called the CRT, the Consejo Regulatory of Tequila, basically the Ministry of Tequila and every Tequila has to be stamped with their approval. We’re talking about analysis…actually taking the product and running tests on it, making sure it is what it is and then just like America has laws...you have to have the font that’s this big and say the alcohol content and Mexico has its own set of rules for the bottle as well.

Monika
So it’s all bottled in Mexico, brought here and has to follow both regulations?

Jacob
Right. Exactly. We are a federal importer but who’s the exporter, right. You didn’t think about that until you’re on the boarder. Someone has to export? Yeah. So there’s taxes importing. There’s taxes exporting from Mexico? I guess the truth is you’re never going to have the answer…so many things happen that you can’t predict…if you’re waiting to be sure, it’s pointless. You can be so sure and such bad things have happened that a year later, I’m like ‘thank God that happened. It took a year.’ Those are some of the biggest things I’ve had to deal with on the operational side.

Monika
So once you got the operational side down…the branding and everything, what did you do? Did you knock on doors? Did you go to liquor stores? Did you go to the distributors? How did you start that part of the process?

Gabe
What a lot of people would want to know is what was your big break? Your big break moment when you thought ‘oh crap, I can do this.’ How do you know when you’re there?

Jacob
I think one of the big break moments was getting distribution through national. It’s sort of real, it’s like let’s say you are a great baseball player and you’re like ‘I’m amazing. I’m one of the best in the world.’ Everyone’s like ‘who do you play for?’ You’re like ‘undrafted.’ It’s a lot different than when you’re like ‘Yankees.’ It’s different so without a distributor you’re not able to get there.

Gabe
What are the expectations of those distributors as far as…what is your responsibility to the brand to produce? They certainly have expectations that go beyond the product and I’m curious, what is it that they put back on you guys, the brander, if you will…

Jacob
…supplier is the technical term…on the brand itself? A lot. The support. Money. Talking about marketing. If we pick this up…someone’s going to buy something from you if they feel they can sell it. So you have the distributor saying ‘ok we’ll buy it from you but why would any liquor store buy it from us?’ ‘Well look, we’re running this big marketing campaign, it’s XYZ, we’re going to offer incentives to your sales people, incentives to the liquor store, we’re going to have…

Gabe
…and that’s all on you guys…

Jacob
…yeah it’s all on us. We’re going to have social media…

Gabe
That’s where a lot of misnomenclature there because a lot of times people think, like in the record industry, ‘I got signed with a label…’ next thing you know, the label now has a list of assignments for you to fulfill. I imagine it’s a lot the same way. You don’t really have that disconnect. You’re like ‘I’m there, I’m at the finish line.’ Next thing you know, you’ve got a ton of homework.

Jacob
That’s right. It’s not exactly like a record label in the sense that…we’re hustling. Especially here, especially local…we’re creating the sales.

Gabe
You figure you’re kind of on that arc right now? The hustle’s not over. You got a long way to climb…

Monika
…it will never be over…

Gabe
You’re going to reach a certain point though where it’s either, you’re on every shelf and with the rest of the nationally recognized brands and that could be one good benchmark but then it becomes a whole different one. It’s ‘how do I steal market share?’ So I’m just curious, where on this slope do you reckon you are?

Jacob
Far away from…Patron might be sitting around thinking ‘what’s this Goza thing happening?’. The truth is instead of necessarily trying to steal market share, because that’s its own challenge, there’s some of that, but it’s about going a different path. Again, going back to Goza and the intimidation, we’re getting new drinkers. Taking this intimidation out…female drinkers that might not be a casual Tequila drinker, too. We’re trying to that because I believe it’s more possible to do that than it is to steal, maybe the Patron drinker, for example.

Gabe
Alright, with that we’re going to take a shot and give you guys some commercials.


Monika
Alright, welcome back everyone. It’s Ringer Radio with Gabe and Monika Meacham and again, if you have any questions for us, you can give us a call at 404-369-0738. We’ll field those questions for you and get you an answer on next week’s show.

Gabe
Let’s plug the business also…

Monika
We’re Ringer Consulting Group at www.hirearinger.com and if you need anything in terms of marketing and social, online digital management or even software creation or website builds. Our number is 404-369-0009. We can be reached at www.hirearinger.com.

Ok so we’ve got Jacob Gluck with us today of Goza Tequila. Great Tequila. We’ve been sitting here sipping on it…

Gabe
…and I’m feeling a little bit of a buzz, I’ve got to say…

Jacob
…a little Goza long way…

Monika
…that’s his little slogan here. Great imagery. Great branding. If anybody hasn’t tried it out there, definitely give it a try, if you like Tequila. It’s a great sipping one. I rarely sip on Tequila and I’m sitting here sipping on it and actually enjoying it, which is pretty awesome.

Jacob
Thank you. That makes me really happy.

Gabe
You crowded in on the scotch market with this whole sipping thing. Making it more central about the theme of the show, tell me a little bit about where you’re at in terms of marketing, specifically to the web. What are some o f the things that you’ve done and had success. What are you looking at doing?

Jacob
So in terms of the web specifically or marketing in general, we’re talking before at this pint, building the brand from the bottom up…grass roots. We can’t compete with the titans of the industry in the same way. We’re not going to out spend them on advertisements in the same way. We do a lot of events…that’s face to face, this sort of interaction. Even you were saying, when you taste the Tequila, there’s something different. When you get in front of people, ‘this is Goza. We’re the people behind it. We’re just normal people.’ That goes a long way. We do a lot of events…charity stuff, party stuff, networking stuff…anything we can really do. We’ve even had a couple of events at Old Age for senior living. They’re request…you’d be surprised.

Monika
You got some good stories there?

Jacob
We don’t take all the events. In the very beginning, any event that came our way we were jumping on, but at the same time it’s still very central to our strategy and in terms of online social media comes to mind almost immediately.

Gabe
Sure. This is definitely a very social product.

Jacob
Yeah, I think so and in terms of cost effectiveness, we can compete on social media. We can’t compete in the billboard game or on the TV commercial game.

Monika
Those billboards are crazy. In downtown Atlanta, we’ve looked up in Roswell ourselves because we’ve contemplated doing the whole billboard thing. As a web company, which you don’t really see, but we contemplated it just out of curiosity but even up there, you’re stuck to long contracts even if it doesn’t work or if you’re not in the right segment and high amounts every month. They do definitely kind of chain you…and it’s one billboard.

Gabe
Most companies have a limited pool to dip into for brand exposure…

Jacob
I have a great billboard man for you. He can solve…remedy some of those things that you just talked about. David Johnson. Plugging you. Give me a discount. 

Gabe
Have you done the billboard thing?

Jacob
I’m actually talking to a big billboard company. Great guy, David, about it for us I think as much as anything else, that’s abut legitimacy. With a billboard, you take a picture of it and you put it on social media. That’s what it’s about.

Gabe
Exactly. Look mom we made it.

Monika
So you’re really into social…

Jacob
…yeah, how do you leverage them? So we pay for this one investment, how do you take that and leverage it over and over and over again? That’s a way you can get bang for buck. What’s nice about not having the budgets of the Tequila titans is it forces you to be extremely efficient, extremely creative and think of other ways, which is great. Necessity breeds invention.  Is that the term?

Trying to take advantage of, going back to marketing…something we talk about all the time…what’s the one advantage we have over the big brands? We can move quickly. We can take bigger chances.

Gabe
I was going to say, you can actually afford to make a mistake. You can be a little bit more risky with your advertising. You can be a little bit more on that edge because the world’s not going to turn against you…

Jacob
…exactly! So taking risks actively is a big part…

Gabe
Something my brother always says too is ‘even bad PR is good PR.’ And I don’t know, maybe.

 Jacob
We are thinking about doing this things…you know how Warren Buffet did his billion dollar bracket, talking about March Madness challenge? We’re trying to do a million peso bracket challenge. Get out there. It’s something fun in the community.

Monika
How are you implementing it? How are you doing this?

Jacob
Well, again, it’s not 100% certain. It’d be a lot of online push, working with bars and restaurants is a great thing. We can go to them and say ‘have your constituents fill this out and if they win the y get X.’ we’re really working through some of the legal stuff, again, like all things, that’s really where the…

Monika
…so do you get lots of legal road blocks

Jacob
I guess my point is, from our…it’s different. It doesn’t require a million bucks to do and like you said, if it works, great, if not, that’s ok too. No one’s going to say ‘there goes the brand.’ So we’re really trying to actively take advantage of the fact that you can pivot, you can take risks. If you’re not taking risks…I’d say to anyone with a business starting out…I just don’t think you’re going to have a shot. It’s really the only way.

Gabe
A lot of people come to me over and over throughout my career and say ‘oh, build a website and I’m going to make tons of money.’ The truth is, if you would have came to me with a great idea 8, 9 years ago, that would absolutely be the case. But all those great ideas have already been covered up, dried up and gone over. You really need to hustle now. There’s no easy way anymore because this whole online thing…it’s a fad, it’s going away…No. There are big players now. You’re right back into your advertising budgets need to be the same as your __ advertising budgets.

Jacob
I think so…especially the focus. So, I’m gong to flip it now on you...nice segue. You’re talking about hustling. It’s obviously with Goza it’s a lot about just pounding the pavement. In your business, it’s probably not different. Can you speak to that?

Gabe
We’ve tried just about everything. All the different things that the consultants and the guys out there tell you to do in terms of put a little bit of this, put a little bit of that, newspaper advertising and stuff like that. Really, it’s action that breeds energy.

 Jacob
Execution…

Monika
…execution and the relationships. A lot of our clients, the reason that they’re with us for so long is because we have such a great relationship with them. We call them up, we joke around with them and have a good time.

Gabe
We were just talking to one of our clients this morning about you on the way in. he’s a chocolatier and he’s like ‘hey, I can make a rum truffle.’

Jacob
You’re so right. Relationships are so important. They’re everything. It’s crazy.

Monika
In our industry, one thing that’s different is you have a bottle that you’re putting in front of people. We have…

Gabe
…we have to describe to you what the bottle’s going to look like….

Monika
…we have to describe what we’re going to do…

Gabe
…how it’s going to work and how much we think it’s going to sell for.

Monika
…we’re selling what’s called “The Invisible” and yeah, you can see the work that we’ve done, but you don’t necessarily know what work you’re going to get when you sign up with us, especially on a website. It’s all about ideas…

Gabe
…and back to the…

Jacob
…the competition in your field is brutal. I know because I’m contacted once a week by…

Monika
…it is, definitely.

Gabe
But really, in our mind, it always comes back to the relationship that you’re able to have with that client. That’s really the Golden Standard for us on whether we’ll keep a client long-term, is do we get along with that client? Do we see eye to eye? Are we able to stay in step and in cadence with that client to where we’re able to bring ideas to them that are maybe 2 weeks too early?

Monika
Which is important because we’re their creative side in some ways. We’re their creative house, especially on the website side and if you don’t have that synergy and that relationship with them, you can’t see through their eyes and help them bring the image and the brand…

Gabe
…I don’t know that we properly answered your question. We’ve tried the radio thing which ends up being a “podcast” that we can throw out there. For us, it’s permanent record of time that we’ve spent with clients, potential clients and just people in the community. That’s why this format for us is great because not only 1. Podcasters don’t get out there on the radio. It just doesn’t happen. So we’re kind of taking this as our initial first step because it helps us organize. Doing a podcast like this because in your office, you’re going to put too much time and thought into it and it’s going to be bland vs. just to come in here doing a live show and then we can use that for anything going forward…podcasts, a little animation for each of our little things, so it can turn into a whole lot more because we have the raw content.

Jacob
The content’s the thing. Seguing back into Goza and social media, the hardest part is ‘well what do we tweet?’ What do we put on Instagram?

Monika
So talking about social media, what would you say is the best social media you’ve been getting so far?

Jacob
I’ll tell you when we come back from this break.

Gabe
I like that.


Gabe
Welcome back to Ringer Radio. Thank you, our special guest host, Jacob, for letting us go to commercial and whatnot. We’re just going to let you take over the show at this point. I hear you have some tough questions that you’ve got for us.

Jacob
Yeah, I want to flip it. It’s more fun for me when I can also ask questions. So you’re in a very competitive industry. The hardest question I get about Goza…and it’s the hardest because it’s a complex answer…and it’s going o be one that when I ask you, you’re going to think the same…

Gabe
…I didn’t know you were going to kick me in the balls.

Jacob
No, I’m not going to just a complex answer. People say, ‘what makes Goza different than any other Tequila?’ Where do I begin? What angle…do you want to talk price, do you want to talk the way it looks? Do you want to talk taste? Do you want to…

Gabe
…you’re getting the drunk answer, by the way…

Jacob
That’s fine.

Monika
Yeah, Gabe’s had a little bit to drink, everyone. It’s good Tequila.

Jacob
So there’s a ton of Ringers out there aren’t there?

Monika
No, not Ringers. There’s a couple of Ringers sitting in front of you but there’s a ton of wannabe Ringers out there.

Jacob
What is the difference?

Gabe
Ok, so the big difference in the marketplace, what you see is a couple of different types of shops.

  1. the shop that they already know what they’re selling the client before they meet the client. So that just tells me that they’re walking into the room, closing their ears, listening to the client for no reason and then pitching whatever they were going to pitch before. That’s one of the hallmark differences. I’m not going to pitch you anything until I know a little bit about your business, a little bit about what your struggles are and really where the best bang for the buck is going to be because you can spend infinite amount of money on guys like us but at the end of the day, there’ sonly going to be certain key things that you did that actually make whatever needle it is, move.

Jacob
What are those things?

Gabe
They’re going to be absolutely different. The first thing you do is you make up…and we agree on what is the matrix for success for us…so we agree on…that way I know how to laser focus and start in on…no matter what I do I’m going to make that needle move, somehow.

So there’s guys that already know what they’re selling and then there’s the other guys that:

  1. they’re in between jobs for the most part or they just graduated from the schools and there’s nothing wrong with these guys but they don’t have a lot of practical experience in terms of what works best over time and what is going to serve you business best over time. If I asked you the question ‘in 10 years, how many websites do you think you’re going to have gone through?’ What would be your guess at this point from where you are in your business?

Jacob
I’d probably say that’s up to you.

Monika
What do you think the answer is without knowing?

Jacob
3

Gabe
The average is every 2 years. So does that mean every single time you flush your content, you start over from scratch and all that? Or does it help, at some point, when we come in, we build a solid foundation with a database that houses all your content, regardless of the design, that houses and facilitates all of the long-term services that are not going to change…

Jacob
…what are long-term services?

Gabe
…where to find us…where you just throw in the zip code and it’s going to show what’s close to you in a map. That likely, the functionality of it, not going to change. In 2 years, the functionality of the overall look and feel of the website, something will change and you, but if you do it right from the get go, you’re not having to dump the entire site. You’re dumping just the front end.

Jacob
Which is different than the backend, which I learned in the coding academy.

Gabe
Our customers, they are constantly getting a new site because we don’t’ deal in templates and stuff like that. We go in and we go ‘this is the section of the site we want to focus on improving this month.’ We get all of our ideas out and we continually improve the site to where at no point does anybody throw anything away unless we really suck it up or the brand makes a huge transition. You’re continually adding to the site and you’re continually refining parts of the site.

Monika
It’s all custom. That’s the biggest…

Jacob
…you’re paying attention, you’re humanizing your clients.

Monika
The biggest thing to point out is it’s all custom work. A lot of individuals out there use templates. It’s a great thing for certain businesses and certain life cycles of their business but there’s a certain point that when you know you’re an established brand and an established company and you want to grow and expand, that if you start off on a custom foundation, you’re going to end up spending less in the long run because you have that foundation that you can constantly restructure.

Gabe
I think I challenge also, is find me one of your major competitors that have anything less than a custom website that they paid a lot of money for. There’s a reason they do it. You just haven’t bumped into what that reason is yet.

Jacob
I havel…the hard way. you should have seen the site that I designed.

Gabe
You’ve got to start off with whatever you got and…

Monika
…but every entrepreneur does. It’s something…

Gabe
…we did. If I showed you my first website I’d be embarrassed.

Jacob
The hard truth is, the only way to learn is the hard way. You go through that stuff…the only way to really learn…it sucks, it’s part of life…is the hard way and there’s really no short cut with that so if  I was y’all’s client what I would come to you and say to you is…I guess I am coming to you and saying:

Make Goza’s website matter. Does 1800’s or Patron’s…theirs actually does. If you could make our website matter in the same way theirs does…they have a whole thing…that’d be a huge accomplishment.

Gabe
Yeah, we figured out the bridges, all the different bridges potential clients can have to your brand and then you figure out ways to either:

  1. put out enough building materials to where your clients themselves will build that bridge or
  2. you find somebody that’s a master bridge maker and say ‘ok, let’s create these structures to where…’ A lot of them are hidden. There’ so many things…

Jacob
Do you market?

Gabe
What do you mean?

Jacob
Do you advertise? Do you market?

Gabe
Ourselves?

Jacob
Yeah, I flipped it, remember?

Gabe
I’m doing it right now. I will tell you, the thing that makes it hard about our market is…you’re familiar with the idea of PPC, Pay Per Click? All of the keywords surrounding our market go for about $45 per click. ALL of them. That’s because you‘ve got the big, big companies. We’re a small shop. You’ve got the big boys that have got 1,000 people crammed into a floor of a building and they’re just cranking out…now some of them, they do great work and some of them…a lot of them charge $350/hour for that great work. So we prefer to stay a little bit smaller, pay a lot more attention to our clients and our key difference is if there’s 1 matrix that we can stout over any other it’s we keep our clients. We do whatever it takes to keep our clients.

I guess with that said, we’ve got a couple things that…

Jacob
…yeah, let’s finish it with a bang.

Gabe
Let’s finish it up with a bang.

Monika
Again everyone, let’s talk about Goza one more time. I just want to mention again, we’ve been sitting here, sipping on it…very good sipping Tequila. There’s not even any ice in here. Normally I have to have my drink with ice.

Jacob
It’s smooth as heck.

Monika
Absolutely. Again, it comes in these 3 flavors. Did we talk about these 3 flavors?

Jacob
We did, at the beginning.

Monika
People can go to your website as well at gozatequila.com. Check it out.

Jacob
Our Facebook, our Instagram.

Monika
What else are you using social wise? Twitter I heard you say.

Jacob
We were about to get into the Snapchat game. I look out there, I see these brands, which is also why I’m excited aobut being in the space and why I feel like we might be able to be successful is I look out and I’m like ‘ok Snapchat’s the biggest thing going.’ No brands are there. Is it just me or am I seeing something different here?

Gabe
Well Snapchat is…I mean, if you’re throwing these parties and stuff like that…because you can put anything on Snapchat and it goes away in 8 seconds…

Monika
…especially with parties. That’d be really good.

Gabe
We tried and thought it’d be really good. I downloaded Snapchat. We’re trying to invent reasons to use Snapchat. You know what we came up with? Nothing.

Jacob
You snap a cool function with a client.

>>lots of Tequila talking<<

Jacob
Really looking at places that aren’t being played in. It’s really exciting for the brand. We’re working hard. I think we got a little mojo going. It’s hard to measure but I feel, on the ground level…

Gabe
Well you definitely have the energy to take the brand there.

Jacob
Thank you. I’m a passionate dude. It’s important. It’s easy for me to be passionate.

Monika
Do you have any events coming up that you can plug? That somebody can come check out?

Jacob
Thursday, Top Golf. 6pm. Atlanta Under 40. It’s about 600 people. It’s a networking group. we sponsor them once a month. It will be great.

Monika
Alright guys, well, we’ve got to wrap it up here on Ringer Radio. Again, if you have any questions, please call us at 404-369-0738. We will field those questions and get you an answer on next week’s show.

Again, this is Gabe and Monika Meacham from Ringer Consulting Group. remember to go to our website at www.hirearinger.com or call us at 404-369-0009.

Gabe
And remember: a little Goza, Goza long way.

Read 2594 times Last modified on Friday, 19 February 2016 12:55

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